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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Washington in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Water Battery

 
 
The Water Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
1. The Water Battery Marker
Inscription. Strategically placed, this permanent section of the fort was the lowest level of the three tiers of guns. The Water Battery was designed to deliver "water-skipping" cannonade directed at the hulls of enemy ships.

The simple V-shaped design has undergone few changes from the original concept. In the 100 years of active duty, new parapets and gun mounts have been added. Still visible are the deep masonry ditches and powder magazines from the 1820 construction.
 
Location. 38° 42.722′ N, 77° 2.12′ W. Marker is near Fort Washington, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Fort Washington Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in Fort Washington Park, at the Water Battery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13551 Fort Washington Road, Fort Washington MD 20744, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. New Guns for an Old Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); Shot and Shell (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Water Battery (about 400 feet away); Self-Destruction (about 400 feet away); Welcome to Fort Washington’s Waterside Trail
The Water Battery Wayside image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
2. The Water Battery Wayside
(about 400 feet away); The Northwest Demi-Bastion (about 400 feet away); Main Gateway (about 400 feet away); Minefields (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Washington.
 
More about this marker. The marker has one main illustration in the upper right provides an overhead view of the V-shaped water battery. Across the lower part of the marker is a profile of the fort batteries, with several important parts indicated - the main fort terreplain with the upper battery, the casemate with the lower fort battery, then the water battery with guns mounted upon its terreplain. The parapet, scarp, ditch and glacis of the water battery are indicated also.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Washington. National Park Service site. (Submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitary
 
The Water Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
3. The Water Battery Marker
The Water Battery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
4. The Water Battery
Endicott era structures disrupted some of the water battery, but still visible are the bombproofs, gun platforms, the scarp, ditch, and glacis. One of the structures appears to have a chimney, indicating it may have housed the hot shot furnace. The furnace would heat solid shot, which when fired at wooden ships, could cause fires.
Ditch of the Water Battery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
5. Ditch of the Water Battery
The park service is renovating portions of the battery.
Apex of the Water Battery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
6. Apex of the Water Battery
Endicott era construction filled in the ditch around the apex of the water battery.
The Water Battery image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
7. The Water Battery
Fortification Terminology image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
8. Fortification Terminology
Terreplain, Parapet, Scarp, Ditch and Glacis
Close-up of image on marker
Apex of the Water Battery image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
9. Apex of the Water Battery
This brick wall is a remnant of the 19th century Water Battery.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,013 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on July 26, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4, 5, 6. submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8, 9. submitted on July 26, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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