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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Penn Quarter in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Daguerre Monument

 
 
The Daguerre Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
1. The Daguerre Monument Marker
Inscription. This monument pays tribute to French Artist and inventor Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (1787–1851), who revolutionized picture-making in 1839 by introducing the first practical form of photography to the world. Known as the daguerreotype, Daguerre's process used chemically sensitized plates of silver-clad copper to produce unique, direct-positive images that won international acclaim for their extraordinary clarity and detail.

In 1889 the Photographers' Association of America commissioned sculptor Jonathan Scott Hartley to create this work to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of Daguerre's achievement. Hartley's design features a likeness of Daguerre based on an original 1848 daguerreotype by American photographer Charles R. Meade (1826–1858) of Meade Brothers Studio. The Sculpture includes the kneeling figure of fame, who frames Daguerre's head with a laurel wreath fashioned from the garland that encircles the globe—a symbol of the international impact of Daguerre's invention. Upon its completion in 1890, the Daguerre Monument was presented to the Smithsonian. It was placed in its current location in 1989, with sponsorship of the Professional Photographers of America, to mark the 150th anniversary of photography.

Jonathan Scott Hartley (1845–1912)
Bronze and granite, cast in 1890 by Henry-Bonnard
The Daguerre Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
2. The Daguerre Monument Marker
Bronze Company
Lent to the National Portrait Gallery by the National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Conservation of the Daguerre Monument in 2014 was made possible with federal support from the Smithsonian Collections Care and Preservation Fund, administered by the National Collections Program and the Smithsonian Advisory Committee.
 
Erected 2014.
 
Location. 38° 53.857′ N, 77° 1.325′ W. Marker is in Penn Quarter, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 7th Street Northwest and F Street Northwest, on the right when traveling south on 7th Street Northwest. Touch for map. at the southeast corner of the National Portrait Gallery. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Daguerre Monument (here, next to this marker); Discover DC (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary Church Terrell (within shouting distance of this marker); The Roots of Freedom and Equality (within shouting distance of this marker); Patent Office Building (within shouting distance
Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre<br>by Charles R. Meade, 1848 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
3. Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre
by Charles R. Meade, 1848
Close-up of daguerreotype reproduced on marker
of this marker); General Post Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Abraham Lincoln Walked Here (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Samuel F. B. Morse (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Penn Quarter.
 
Also see . . .
1. Who Is That Frenchman on Seventh Street?. National Portrait Gallery, Face to Face blog. (Submitted on February 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. History and Practice of Photogenic Drawing. A translation of Daguerre's booklet describing his technique. (Submitted on February 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicScience & Medicine
 
Dedication image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. Dedication
To commemorate the half century in photography 1839-1899. Erected by the Photographers Association of America Aug. 1890.
Three Great Discoveries image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
5. Three Great Discoveries
Photography, the electric telegraph, and the steam engine are the three great discoveries of the age. No five centuries in human progress can show such strides as these.
Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre<br>by Jonathan Scott Hartley image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
6. Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre
by Jonathan Scott Hartley
Fame Draping the Garland over Daguerre's Head image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
7. Fame Draping the Garland over Daguerre's Head
Fame Draping the Garland over Daguerre's Head image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
8. Fame Draping the Garland over Daguerre's Head
The Daguerre Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
9. The Daguerre Monument
In the Museum image. Click for full size.
By J. W. Smillie
10. In the Museum
This photo showing the monument in a niche in the Arts and Industries Building appeared in The American Annual of Photography and Photographic Times Almanac for 1891 in article entitled “Portraits of Daguerre.” The monument remained inside the building until 1897.
On the Mall image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
11. On the Mall
This Library of Congress photo shows the monument on the mall between 1918 and 1920. The monument remained on the mall in "the grounds on the east side of the Arts and Industries Building" from 1897 until 1969 when it was placed in storage. It re-emerged in 1989 in its present location.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 395 times since then and 80 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on February 17, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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