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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pawleys Island in Georgetown County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Brookgreen Plantation

 
 
Brookgreen Plantation Marker, Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 22, 2015
1. Brookgreen Plantation Marker, Side 1
Inscription. Title to the land that comprised Brookgreen plantation is traced to a patent for 48,000 acres granted to Robert Daniell in 1711. The property passed to the Allston family when William Allston bought it circa 1740. William Allston Jr. acquired it in 1764 and developed it as his home plantation. By 1799 title had passed to Joshua Ward, whose son, Joshua John Ward, was born here in 1800.

Joshua John Ward was active in the Winyah and All Saints Agricultural Society and was noted for his development of long-grain rice. He would become among the wealthiest planters in the nation. In 1850 Ward’s plantations, including Brookgreen, yielded 3,900,000 pounds of rice on land cultivated by 1,092 enslaved laborers. Ward and his descendants lived here until 1938.
 
Erected 2014 by National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century, Chicora Chapter. (Marker Number 22-60.)
 
Location. 33° 31.085′ N, 79° 5.757′ W. Marker is near Pawleys Island, South Carolina, in Georgetown County. Marker is on Henry Flagg Loop near William Alston Loop. Touch for map. Marker is on one of the medians of the Welcome Center parking lot inside Brookside Gardens. You must pay to enter the gardens to see the marker. Marker is in this post office area: Pawleys Island SC 29585, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Brookgreen Plantation Marker, Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 22, 2015
2. Brookgreen Plantation Marker, Side 2
At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Washington Allston (a few steps from this marker); Washington’s Visit (within shouting distance of this marker); Joseph Alston (within shouting distance of this marker); Theodosia Burr Alston (within shouting distance of this marker); Joseph & Theodosia Burr Alston (approx. 1.1 miles away); Hot and Hot Fish Club (approx. 2.6 miles away); All Saints Parish (1767) / All Saints, Waccamaw (approx. 4.3 miles away); Murrells Inlet Boat Captains (approx. 4.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pawleys Island.
 
Also see . . .  Brookgreen Gardens Wikipedia Entry. “Brookgreen Gardens is a sculpture garden and wildlife preserve, located just south of Murrells Inlet, in South Carolina. The 9,100-acre property includes several themed gardens with American figurative sculptures placed in them, the Lowcountry Zoo, and trails through several ecosystems in nature reserves on the property. It was founded by Archer Milton Huntington, stepson of railroad magnate Collis Potter Huntington, and his wife Anna Hyatt Huntington to feature sculptures by Anna and her sister Harriet Hyatt along with other American sculptors. Brookgreen Gardens was opened in 1932, and is built on four former rice plantations, taking its name from the former Brookgreen Plantation.”
Brookgreen Plantation Marker, Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 22, 2015
3. Brookgreen Plantation Marker, Side 1
Brookgreen Sculpture Gardens Welcome Center is in the background.
(Submitted on February 23, 2015.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureAntebellum South, US
 
Brookgreen Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 22, 2015
4. Brookgreen Plantation Marker
Brookgreen Sculpture Gardens Gift Shop in in the background.
Brookgreen Plantation House Site, Now a Raised Pond and Fountain with Sculpture image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 22, 2015
5. Brookgreen Plantation House Site, Now a Raised Pond and Fountain with Sculpture
The Waccamaw River, from where visitors would arrive until the 20th century, is behind the photographer so this would be the front of the house. The two circular stones on either side of the path are rice millstones.

A small museum card at the pond reads: “The original house was probably built by William Allston (c. 1738–1781) around 1764. It was a two-story, colonial design with a pair of chimneys built on the exterior walls, a central hallway, and four rooms on each floor. Allston’s widow, Rachel, married Dr. Henry Collins Flagg in 1784 and they lived here until 1799. Joshua Ward purchased the property in 1800 and his son, Joshua John Ward (1800–1853) was born here. J. J. Ward was the wealthiest of the Georgetown rice planters, owning eight plantations and receiving awards for rice cultivation. He enlarged the house, adding wings on each side of the original structure, a ballroom, and a wine cellar. The house burned in 1901.”

The pond is lined with latticed brick interrupted by brick-framed stone. The center stone on this photograph is inscribed: “This fountain occupies the site of the original house which was burned in 1901. A subsequent modern structure which replaced it has been removed. It serves as the main reservoir for the distribution of water to all points of the garden.”

The Italian marble sculpture at the far end of the pond is titled “Alligator Bender” by Nathaniel Choate (1899–1965). It was carved in 1937.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 23, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 325 times since then and 89 times this year. Last updated on February 23, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 23, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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