Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Graniteville in Washington County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

In the late 1950ís Rock of Ages experimented with making lanes out of granite...

 
 
1950's Rock of Ages Granite Bowling Lane Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
1. 1950's Rock of Ages Granite Bowling Lane Marker
Inscription.
In the late 1950ís Rock of Ages experimented with making lanes out of granite for use in commercial bowling alleys. Although a few such alleys were created, the concept never caught on. This prototype was used for many years by employees and visitors alike, but then was neglected and fell into disrepair. We have restored the old lane, with a few exceptions. We left the gutters as they are to demonstrate how the reinforced concrete has weathered, while the granite alley is virtually untouched by the passing years. There is no automation here. Step back in time with your family to an era when “pin boys” reset pins and returned balls. Take turns as the designated “pin person” and have a ball.
 
Erected by Rock of Ages Granite Quarry.
 
Location. 44° 9.307′ N, 72° 29.495′ W. Marker is in Graniteville, Vermont, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Graniteville Road. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the subject granite bowling alley, on the grassy knoll along the south side of the Rock of Ages Quarry visitor center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 558 Graniteville Road, Graniteville VT 05654, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured
1950's Rock of Ages Granite Bowling Lane image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
2. 1950's Rock of Ages Granite Bowling Lane
as the crow flies. Thomas Davenport (approx. 3.3 miles away); Davenport Birthplace (approx. 3.4 miles away); Town of Williamstown (approx. 3.4 miles away); Senator William Upham (approx. 8.4 miles away); Norwich University (approx. 8.4 miles away); State House (approx. 8.6 miles away); Vermont Equality For Same-Sex Couples (approx. 8.6 miles away); Ethan Allen (approx. 8.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Rock of Ages Granite Quarry History.
George B. Milne, one of the three founders of Rock of Ages, opened his first granite manufacturing business in 1885. During the last decade of the nineteenth century he had several short-lived partnerships. In 1905, he joined forces with quarry owners James Boutwell and Harvey Varnum, forming Boutwell, Milne & Varnum Company ("BM&V"). (Submitted on March 8, 2015, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Smith Granite Quarry.
The Upper E. L. Smith Quarry is said to be the "largest and deepest dimension granite quarry in the world." It is one of several in the region, most of which are owned and operated by the Rock of Ages company. The grey granite of the Graniteville quarries is popular, especially for cemetery memorials, and that is the main business of nearby Barre. (Submitted on March 8, 2015, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesSports
 
1950's Rock of Ages Granite Bowling Lane image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
3. 1950's Rock of Ages Granite Bowling Lane
Cement gutter on the right shows weathering while the granite lane surface does not.
Rock of Ages Entrance & Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
4. Rock of Ages Entrance & Visitor Center
Adjacent to the historical granite bowling lane.
Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (<i>deep view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
5. Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (deep view)
The Upper E. L. Smith Quarry, at 600 feet deep, is said to be the "largest and deepest dimension granite quarry in the world." It is one of several in the region, most of which are owned and operated by the Rock of Ages company. The grey granite of the Graniteville quarries is popular, especially for cemetery memorials. This quarry rests atop a granite vein 6 miles long, 4 miles wide and 10 miles deep.
Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
6. Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (wide view)
Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (<i>working detail</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
7. Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (working detail)
Granite was originally quarried using primitive techniques which implemented hand saws and explosive charges to blast away the "benches" of the quarry. Modern techniques have evolved to include diamond-tipped wire saws and water jets.
Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (<i>working detail</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
8. Upper E. L. Smith Quarry (working detail)
Grout Piles image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
9. Grout Piles
Since 1885, quarry workers have simply dumped pieces of granite with fractures or cracks in these piles, called "grout piles," which comes from the Scottish word for scrap (many Scots worked in the quarry in its early days).
Temporary Granite Slab Storage image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2006
10. Temporary Granite Slab Storage
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 24, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 7, 2015, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 256 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 7, 2015, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on March 8, 2015, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement