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Tullahoma in Coffee County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Tullahoma Campaign

June 24-July 4, 1863

 

—Race to Tullahoma —

 
Tullahoma Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 24, 2014
1. Tullahoma Campaign Marker
Inscription. When the Union Army of the Cumberland captured Manchester on June 27th, Braxton Bragg’s Confederate forces retreated here to Tullahoma - a supply base and Army of Tennessee headquarters since January, 1863. Tullahoma, however, was tactically a vulnerable position. Lieutenant General Leonidas Polk insisted the army retreat to Chattanooga because the swollen Elk River to the south would give Rosecrans the opportunity to cross the Tennessee River in northern Alabama region barren of supplies and swarming with Unionists and threaten the bluff city. General William J. Hardee, on the other hand, advised Bragg to make a stand in Tennessee, preferable south of the Elk River. While debating their strategy, Colonel James Wilder’s “Lightening Brigade” crossed the Elk River in their rear and began raiding the southern railroad line near Decherd. Late in the day on June 30th, Bragg issued orders to withdraw to the south, taking up a position in Dechard by late evening.

(sidebar)
Ft. Raines
When the war began many Americans, North and South, anticipated a short struggle. But as quick battlefield victories became more elusive, both the Union and Confederate armies resorted to constructing heavily fortified positions to protect against frontal assaults and guard critical supplies. Obstacles, such as log
Close up of map shown on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 24, 2014
2. Close up of map shown on the marker
breastworks, earthen mounds, and earthen forts became an important part of the Civil War landscape. Here at Tullahoma the Confederates constructed an earthen fortification, Ft. Raines, and entrenched infantry and artillery positions surrounding the town and vital railroad junction. When Braxton Bragg retreated behind his fortifications, Union General William Rosecrans, slowed his speedy approach to take into consideration the Confederates prepared positions.

(captions)
(lower left) Confederate President Jefferson Davis visited Bragg, an old personal friend from their time together in the Mexican War, while he built up his Tullahoma defenses. The attempt to iron out disputes among Bragg’s ranks proved ultimately unsuccessful.
(lower center) Ft. Raines from a sketch by a Union mapmaker during the occupation of Tullahoma (1863)
 
Erected by Tennessee's Backroads Heritage.
 
Location. 35° 21.41′ N, 86° 12.443′ W. Marker is in Tullahoma, Tennessee, in Coffee County. Marker is at the intersection of South Jackson Street (U.S. 41A) and West Volney Street, on the right when traveling south on South Jackson Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tullahoma TN 37388, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking
Distant shot showing the various markers image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 24, 2014
3. Distant shot showing the various markers
distance of this marker. A different marker also named Tullahoma Campaign (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Tullahoma Campaign (here, next to this marker); Confederate Cemetery (here, next to this marker); Army of Tennessee (here, next to this marker); Isham G. Harris (here, next to this marker); Camp Forrest (a few steps from this marker); Baillet Sisters (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Red Caboose (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tullahoma.
 
Also see . . .  Tennessee's Backroads. (Submitted on July 14, 2014.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 14, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 355 times since then and 44 times this year. Last updated on March 12, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 14, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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