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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Topeka in Shawnee County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

How to Heat and Cool an Old School

 
 
How to Heat and Cool an Old School Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 15, 2015
1. How to Heat and Cool an Old School Marker
Inscription.

During the summer, neighborhood kids play baseball on the grass field across the street - just as they have for nearly a century. But even more excitement is taking place underground. This playground is home to a state of the art geothermal heating and cooling system.

Below the turf, 70 wells reach down more than 250 feet (80 m) where the temperature is always 56F (13C). There, recirculating well water is cooled in the summer and heated in the winter, keeping visitors to the former school comfortable and cutting the park's energy costs by half since its installation in 2002.

[Illustration captions read]
For the efficient transfer of energy, heat exchange systems rely on large areas of land. In this case, the acre of playing fields is a perfect venue.

Miles of pipes with water and antifreeze travel through the playfield, either being warmed or cooled by the surrounding soil. Although expensive to install, a geothermal system can pay for itself in about a decade.

The miles of hose that run beneath the field serve as an efficient heat exchange, the same way your car's radiator cools fluids by dispersing heat to the air.

During the summer, supply lines pump warm fluids into the field to be cooled. The cooler fluid returns to the building to aid in cooling. This process is reversed in the winter.

Wells

How to Heat and Cool an Old School Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 15, 2015
2. How to Heat and Cool an Old School Marker
must extend at least 20 feet (6 m) below the surface to benefit from a constant temperature that is not affected by variations in air temperature. The wells here continue an additional 230 feet (67 m) to compensate for the temperature exchange from the system.
 
Erected 2014 by National Park Service.
 
Location. 39° 2.263′ N, 95° 40.577′ W. Marker is in Topeka, Kansas, in Shawnee County. Marker is on SE Monroe Street south of SE 15th Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1515 SE Monroe Street, Topeka KS 66612, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Monroe School Neighborhood (a few steps from this marker); Monroe School (a few steps from this marker); A Playground and Community Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Pillars of the Community (within shouting distance of this marker); Standing Up for Their Rights (within shouting distance of this marker); A "Separate But Equal" School? (within shouting distance of this marker); A Turning Point for Equality (within shouting distance of this marker); G.A.R. Memorial Building (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Topeka.
 
Also see . . .  Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site. (Submitted on March 12, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EnvironmentMan-Made Features
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 12, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 192 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 12, 2015, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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