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Greeneville in Greene County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Capitol of State of Franklin

 
 
Capitol of State of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
1. Capitol of State of Franklin Marker
Inscription. This is a replica of the building which is believed to have served as the capitol of the State of Franklin from 1785 until 1788 and which originally stood near the intersection of Main and Depot Streets. At constitutional conventions held there, competing proposals engendered bitter controversy and resulted in the first political pamphlets produced west of the Appalachians. Chief protagonists were three Presbyterian clergymen, Rev. Samuel Houston, Rev. William Graham, and Rev. Hezekiah Balch. The Franklin Legislature, which also met there, challenged the authority of North Carolina by passing laws to levy taxes, raise a militia, establish courts, authorize the performance of marriages, and open a land office.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 1C 70.)
 
Location. 36° 9.861′ N, 82° 49.712′ W. Marker is in Greeneville, Tennessee, in Greene County. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 204 N. College St, Greeneville TN 37744, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andrew Johnson (within shouting distance of this marker); Greeneville, Tennessee (within shouting distance of this marker); Benjamin Lundy
Capitol of State of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
2. Capitol of State of Franklin Marker
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Big Spring (about 400 feet away); Old Harmony Graveyard (about 400 feet away); Ellen “Nelly” VanVactor (about 500 feet away); Greeneville Cumberland Presbyterian Church (about 500 feet away); Robert Kerr (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greeneville.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Lost State of Franklin. (Submitted on October 14, 2009, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
2. Wikipedia entry for the State of Franklin. “Rapidly increasing dissatisfaction with North Carolina’s governance led to the frontiersmen's calls to establish a separate, secure, and independent state. On August 23, 1784, delegates from the North Carolina counties of Washington (which at the time included present day Carter County), Sullivan, Spencer (now Hawkins County) and Greene—all of which are in present-day Tennessee—convened in the town of Jonesborough. There, they declared the lands to be independent of the State of North Carolina.” (Submitted on August 22, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Capitol of State of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
3. Capitol of State of Franklin Marker
Capitol of State of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
4. Capitol of State of Franklin Marker
Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
5. Capitol
Lost State of Franklin 1784 - 88 Restored 1966
The Eight Counties of the Sate of Franklin, circa 1786 image. Click for full size.
By Iamvereed via Wikipedia Commons
6. The Eight Counties of the Sate of Franklin, circa 1786
Original North Carolina territory, today in Northeast Tennessee.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 9, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,104 times since then and 71 times this year. Last updated on March 17, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page was the Marker of the Week August 23, 2015. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 9, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   6. submitted on August 22, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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