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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chattanooga in Hamilton County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Military History of Chattanooga

 
 
Military History of Chattanooga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 5, 2014
1. Military History of Chattanooga Marker
Inscription. This city was first occupied by Confederate troops in the spring of 1862 under Generals Floyd, Maxey and Leadbetter. Union troops under General Mitchell shelled it June 7 and 8. Bragg's Army occupied it in August preparing for the Kentucky campaign, again in the fall on its return from Kentucky, and in the summer of 1863 when retiring before Rosecrans from Middle Tennessee. Wilder shelled the city from Stringer's Ridge August 21. Bragg evacuated it Sept. 7 and 8, and a small Union force took possession. Rosecrans occupied it in force the second morning after the Battle of Chickamagua, and thereafter it remained in Union control. Thomas succeeded Rosecrans Oct. 19.

Grant took general command Oct. 23. A short line of supplies to Bridgeport by Brown's Ferry was opened Oct. 28, upon a plan devised by General Rosecrans. Hooker's forces arrived in Lookout Valley on that date and fought the Battle of Wauhatchie. Sherman's troops crossed the Tennessee above the city during the night of Nov. 23.

On that day the Army of the Cumberland carried Orchard Knob.

Nov. 24, Hooker's column captured the north slope of Lookout Mountain. On Nov. 25, Missionary Ridge, excepting Cleburne's position at Tunnel Hill and the intervening line to Walthall's Stand north of De Long's was carried by Grant's combined Armies, Bragg retreated
Military History of Chattanooga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 5, 2014
2. Military History of Chattanooga Marker
View of the historical marker, looking south along the public sidewalk that runs along the eastern side of Georgia Avenue, and the western side of Phillips Park.
to Dalton.
 
Erected by Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Battlefield Commission.
 
Location. 35° 2.893′ N, 85° 18.403′ W. Marker is in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in Hamilton County. Marker is on Georgia Avenue south of McCallie Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. This historical marker is located on the eastern edge of the downtown district, in Phillips Park, a small community park. Marker is in this post office area: Chattanooga TN 37402, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Abby Crawford Milton (within shouting distance of this marker); First Methodist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); First Coca-Cola Bottling Company In The United States (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); William (Uncle Bill) Lewis (approx. 0.2 miles away); William "Uncle Bill" Lewis (approx. 0.2 miles away); Chattanooga's First School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Sherman (approx. 0.2 miles away); Chattanooga Daily Rebel (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chattanooga.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Military History of Chattanooga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 5, 2014
3. Military History of Chattanooga Marker
View of the historical marker looking north along Georgia Avenue.
Military History of Chattanooga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 5, 2014
4. Military History of Chattanooga Marker
View, looking east, of the historical marker with portions of Phillips Park and McCallie Avenue in the background.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 26, 2014, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 224 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on March 18, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 27, 2014, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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