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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Los Angeles in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Fort Moore

Pioneer Memorial and Park

 
 
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
1. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park
Inscription.
On this site stood
Fort Moore built by the
Mormon Battalion during
the War with Mexico
This memorial honors the troops who helped to win the South West.

The Flag of the United States was raised here on July 4th 1847
by United States Troops at the First Independence Celebration in Los Angeles.
The United States 1st Dragoons who fought at San Pasqual.

The New York Volunteers who came by sea.

The Mormon Battalion which made one of the longest and most arduous infantry marches in history.
 
Erected 1949 by The Board of Supervisors of the County of Los Angeles.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of Utah Pioneers, and the Mormon Battalion marker series.
 
Location. 34° 3.455′ N, 118° 14.535′ W. Marker is in Los Angeles, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker is on North Hill Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located between China Town and the downtown District of Los Angeles. Marker is in this post office area: Los Angeles CA 90012, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pico House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Merced Theatre
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
2. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park
To the brave men and women who with trust in God faced privation and death in extending the frontier of our country to include This Land of Promise.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Nuestra Senora la Reina de Los Angeles (approx. 0.2 miles away); Father Junipero Serra 1713-1784 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Main Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bella Union Hotel Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jones Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); Machine Shop (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Los Angeles.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Moore. Building Fort Moore was a proposition that progressed in direct proportion to the enemy threat. It started in a state of siege, had a short but eventful history, and then quietly disappeared from the Army rolls. (Submitted on February 12, 2012.) 

2. The Siege of Los Angeles and Fort Moore. The material for the fort was obtained from timber in the San Gabriel mountains, with the volunteer Mormon battalion doing most of the work. (Submitted on February 12, 2012.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, Mexican-American
 
The Mexican War image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
3. The Mexican War
Opening of Roads
Discovery of Gold
The Settlement of the State
Battalion Members image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
4. Battalion Members
took part in events which ushered in the American Era of California History.
The March to Santa Fe image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
5. The March to Santa Fe
and the opening of The First Wagon Road to the Pacific helped to end the isolation of the west and inspired the Gadsen Purchase of 1853.
July 16, 1846 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
6. July 16, 1846
The Mormon Battalion Recruited from camps of Mormon pioneers enroute to the west enlisted for service in the Mexican War at Council Bluffs.
Water and Power image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
7. Water and Power
have made our arid land flourish. May we keep faith with the pioneers who brought us these gifts.
Ranchos, Schooners image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
8. Ranchos, Schooners
On Ranchos where herds of cattle ranged, pioneers built homes and planted vineyards and orange groves. The Prairie Schooners stage and iron horse brought many settlers who made Los Angeles a City.
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
9. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
10. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
11. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
12. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
13. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial and Park
Designed and Constructed
by
Architects
Kazumi Adachi and Dike Nagano
County of Los Angeles
Arthur j. Will - Chief Administrative Officer
John A. Lambte - County Engineer
E.C.N. Brett - Chief Architect

Contractors
M.J. Brock & Sons
John L. Meek, Construction Company
Gadding, McBean & Co - Ceramic Veneer Manufacturer
A.H. Maxted - Masonry Contractor

In Memoriam
Doyle Strong Who Lost his life in the Construction of this Monument.
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2010
14. Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial
Erected 1949-1957
by The Board of Supervisors of the county of Los Angeles
with the cooperation of
Los Angeles City Council
Los Angeles city Board of Education
Los Angeles City Department of Water and Power
Los Angeles County Daughter of the Utah Pioneers
Sons of the Utah Pioneers

----------------------
Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial Advisory Committee
John Anson Ford, Chairman
Dorothy B Chandler
Olin Darby
May Bedle T Davis
John F Howells, Jr.
Charles O. Matcham, Albert Stewart, Art Advisor
John H Mathews
S.B. Robinson
Alexander J. Stoddard
H. A Van Norman
Hugh C. Willett
Cora Fischer, Secretary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 10, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 773 times since then and 74 times this year. Last updated on March 18, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on February 10, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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