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Near Shiloh in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Confederate Memorial

 
 
Confederate Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
1. Confederate Memorial Marker
Inscription. Shiloh's Confederate Monument combines symbolism with beauty to commemorate the story of the Southern "Lost Cause" in the fields and woods near Shiloh Church. Its prominent location marks a Confederate high water mark. Here, on April 6, 1862, Confederates encircled and captured over 2,200 Federal troops, including General Benjamin Prentiss, thus ending Union defense of the Hornets Nest.

Over eighteen feet high, the monument's central figures depict "Defeated Victory." In front, the South surrenders the laurel wreath of victory to Death on her right, and Night on her left. Death took away the Confederate commander-in-chief; while Night, having brought re-enforcements for the Federals, stands waiting to complete the defeat.

Below them, in low relief, appears the figure of General Albert Sidney Johnston, the southern commander, Johnston remains the highest ranking American officer ever to die in combat.

The panel of heads to the right represents the spirit of the first day's battle. Exuberantly, hopefully, courageously, fearless, the young Confederates rush into battle. The eleven soldiers portrayed equal the number of Confederate states.

The soldiers on the panel to the left, now fewer in number, represent the second day's battle. Driven back over ground they had gained the day before, Confederates are finally
Confederate Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
2. Confederate Memorial
See the nearby marker entry for close up photos of the features of the memorial described on the marker's text.
forced to retreat. The panel shows the sorrow of the men who fought so hard for victory so nearly won, and so unexpectedly lost. The symbolically depicted "wave upon wave of soldiery" is now past its crest.

At the far right, the Infantryman has snatched up the Confederate flag in defiance of the U.S. Army. In support by his side, the Artilleryman calmly gazes through the smoke of battle.

To the left, the Cavalryman spreads his hand in frustration. Although eager to assist, the cavalry could not penetrate Shiloh's thick undergrowth. The rear figure, head bowed in submission to the order to cease firing, represents the Confederate officer corps. At that point on the evening of the battle's first day, Confederate victory had seemed imminent.

On the monument's rear wall, three plaques provide additional information on design and construction.

In 1905, the United Daughters of the Confederacy undertook a national project to place a monument on Shiloh Battlefield. In reaching their goal of $50,000, the UDC raised money "little by little," without help from other organizations or any state appropriation.

The monument committee held a design competition in 1913. When none of the submitted models embodied the ideas of the committee, all six initial entries were rejected. The contest was reopened in 1914. A new competitor, Frederick C. Hibbard of Chicago,
Confederate Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By L. David Barnette, September 18, 2010
3. Confederate Memorial Marker
Courtesy of Bell's Partisans Camp #1821 Sons of Confederate Veterans
won the first prize: the contract for building the monument.

Born on June 15, 1881, Missouri native Frederick Cleveland Hibbard studied abroad, in California, and in the Midwest. His work includes the Hannibal, Missouri statues of Mark Twain, and the author's characters Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn; and the equestrian statue of General Ulysses S. Grant at Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi.

Excavation for the monument's concrete foundation began on June 21, 1916. Among the articles placed in the cornerstone on November 4, 1916, were silver coins from 1905 and 1916, a $20 Confederate bill, a state flag from every southern state, a replica of the Confederate Seal, a photograph of sculptor Hibbard, and a lock of General Johnston's hair.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 35° 8.424′ N, 88° 20.094′ W. Marker is near Shiloh, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is on Corinth-Pittsburg Landing Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located between Cloud and Stacy Field on Shiloh Battlefield National Park. Marker is in this post office area: Shiloh TN 38376, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Confederate Memorial (within
Confederate Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By L. David Barnette, September 18, 2010
4. Confederate Memorial Marker
Courtesy of Bell's Partisans Camp #1821 Sons of Confederate Veterans
shouting distance of this marker); 15th Michigan Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 5th Tennessee Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 14th Wisconsin Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 12th Iowa Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 22nd Tennessee Infantry (about 300 feet away); Camp of 3d Iowa Infantry (about 400 feet away); 58th Illinois Infantry (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shiloh.
 
More about this marker. Photos at the bottom right show the dedication ceremony. May 17, 1917. At dedication ceremonies, the band of William B. Saxby played selections including "Overture from William Tell," "My Old Kentucky Home," "The Cavalry Charge," and "America."
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Confederate Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By L. David Barnette, September 18, 2010
5. Confederate Memorial Marker
Courtesy of Bell's Partisans Camp #1821 Sons of Confederate Veterans
Marker and the Confederate Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
6. Marker and the Confederate Memorial
Confederate Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
May 17, 1917
7. Confederate Memorial Marker
Kurt Masse's relatives in front of Memorial on the day of dedication.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 3, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,269 times since then and 73 times this year. Last updated on March 22, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 3, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on October 25, 2010, by L. David Barnette of Trenton, Tennessee.   6. submitted on October 3, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on May 17, 2010, by Kurt Masse of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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