Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington, D.C. —

 
Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2008
1. Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives Marker
Inscription. 17th and M Streets, NW
This school, completed in 1872, was one of three public elementary schools built for DC's black children just after the Civil War. Its name honors U.S. Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, who fought to abolish slavery here, pay black soldiers the same as whites, establish the Freedman's Bureau, and provide education to all children. Designed by Adolf Cluss, Sumner opened as the city's most modern school building. After it closed in 1978, Sumner School was saved from demolition through an organized community effort. Today it serves as a museum on public education and the repository of the DC Public School System's official archives.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, DC African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.356′ N, 77° 2.298′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 17th Street NW and M Street NW, on the right when traveling north on 17th Street NW. Touch for map. Located at the entrance to the Charles Sumner School and Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1201 17th Street NW, Washington DC 20036, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The School is on the National Register image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2008
2. The School is on the National Register
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Nuns of the Battlefield (about 500 feet away); Daniel Webster Memorial (about 600 feet away); General Federation of Women’s Clubs (about 600 feet away); Admiral Miguel Grau (about 700 feet away); Winfield Scott (about 700 feet away); Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Metropolitan AME Church (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Downtown.
 
More about this marker. On the right side of the marker is a photograph of a classroom captioned, Sewing class in a DC public elementary school, around 1899. From the Francis Benjamin Johnson Collection, Library of Congress.
 
Also see . . .  Charles Sumner School. National Park Service page. (Submitted on June 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
Entrance to the School Museum image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2008
3. Entrance to the School Museum
Charles Sumner School image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 2, 2008
4. Charles Sumner School
Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, July 20, 2016
5. Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives
The M Street side of the Museum and Archives, seen roughly from the intersection of M and 17th Streets.
Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives, M Street entrance image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, July 20, 2016
6. Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives, M Street entrance
This entrance, normally closed, includes a medallion to District of Colombia Public Schools (left) and a duplicate National Register of Historic Places marker (right).
Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 21, 2010
7. Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives
- across M Street from the National Geographic Society Museum.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,541 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on July 20, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   7. submitted on May 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.
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