Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vonore in Monroe County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Tennessee Overhill Experience-From Furs to Factories

Overhill Fur & Hide Trade

 
 
The Tennessee Overhill Experience-From Furs to Factories Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
1. The Tennessee Overhill Experience-From Furs to Factories Marker
Inscription. From the beginning of the eighteenth century until the American Revolution, Cherokee hunters and trappers traded tens of thousands of animal pelts for manufactured goods imported by licensed British traders. The first resident trader in the Overhill Towns settled at Tanasee (Tennessee) in 1711.

Unchecked harvesting of animals for commercial purposes severely depleted the Cherokees’ main sources of meat, especially white-tailed deer. In-coming trade goods transformed or replaced many traditional Cherokee crafts. This “deerskin trade” soon made the Cherokees economically dependent on foreigners. It also made fortunes for middlemen and entrepreneurs in the port city of Charleston (now South Carolina), and in England, where this new wealth helped spark the Industrial Revolution.

(Inscription under the photo in the upper right)
On one day, July 14, 1716, Commissioners of the Indian Trade recorded that 21 Cherokee burden bearers brought in 418 beaverskins which were exchanged for “400 weight of gun powder, 200 and a half of shot, and 7 pieces of strouds, 1000 flints, 7 brass kettles, 20 yards of half thicks.”

Anglo-American trade objects from Overhill Cherokee sites: 1. Iron knife; 2. Iron ax; 3. and 4. Glass beads; 5. Brass bell; 6. Iron scissors; 7. Iron Jew’s harp; 8. Iron hoe.-Photograph from Chapman,

Close up of map shown on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
2. Close up of map shown on the marker
Tellico Archeology, 1985

(Captions)
(Lower right)
This site is part of the Tennessee Overhill Heritage Trail and is an official Tennessee 200 Bicentennial Project. Interpretive signs, museums, historic sites and a guidebook tell the story of the Industrial Revolution as it happened in McMinn, Monroe, and Polk Counties. For more information concerning other sites, contact the Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association at 423-263-7232

The Tennessee Overhill Experience: From Furs to Factories was funded by the Tennessee Department of Transportation; Tennessee 200, Inc; East Tennessee Foundation; and the counties of McMinn, Monroe, and Polk.
 
Location. 35° 34.782′ N, 84° 12.984′ W. Marker is in Vonore, Tennessee, in Monroe County. Marker is on Tennessee Route 360. Touch for map. The marker is on the grounds of the Sequoyan Birthplace Museum-Memorial-Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Vonore TN 37885, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cherokee Heritage Trails (within shouting distance of this marker); Unicoi Turnpike Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Loudon (approx. 0.6 miles away); Welcome to Fort Loudoun State Historic Area

The Tennessee Overhill Experience-From Furs to Factories image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
3. The Tennessee Overhill Experience-From Furs to Factories
(approx. 1.2 miles away); a different marker also named Unicoi Turnpike Trail (approx. 1.2 miles away); Fort Loudoun (approx. 1.3 miles away); Cherokee Villages (approx. 1.3 miles away); Sequoyah (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vonore.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative Americans
 
Sign at entrance to the Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
4. Sign at entrance to the Memorial
Dedicated to William F. "Bill" Martin 1937-2002 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
5. Dedicated to William F. "Bill" Martin 1937-2002
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 17, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 252 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on April 9, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 17, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement