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New Windsor in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Temple

 
 
The Temple Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
1. The Temple Marker
This monument marks the site where the "Temple of Virtue" was thought to be located. Later archeological digs revealed that the actual location was a few yards to the north, where the reconstructed Temple exists today. The present-day Temple can be seen in the background of this photo.
Inscription.
Front of Monument:
On this ground was erected
“The Temple”
or new public building
by the Army of the Revolution
-- 1782 – 83 --
-------------------
The birthplace of the Republic.

Right Side of Monument:
This tablet is inserted by the Masonic
Fraternity of Newburgh in memorial of
----- WASHINGTON -----
and his Masonic compeers under whose
direction and plans the Temple was
constructed and in which communications
of the Fraternity were held – 1783.

Back of Monument:
Erected by the Newburgh
Revolutionary Monument Association
---- 1891 ----
E.M. Ruttenber, President.
Jos. M. Dickey, Vice Pres.
A.A. McLean, Treasír.
Russel Headley, Secíy.

Left Side of Monument:
Omnia Reliouit Servare Rempublicam
On this site the Society of the Cincinnati was born May 10th 1783, at the last cantonment of the American Army and it still lives to perpetuate the memories of the Revolution.
Committee of the New York State Society of the Cincinnati 4 July 1892
Thomas M.L. Chrystie CHAIRMAN
William Linn Keese
John Schuyler

 
Erected 1891 by Newburgh Revolutionary Monument Association.
 
Location.
Front of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
2. Front of Monument
41° 28.349′ N, 74° 3.573′ W. Marker is in New Windsor, New York, in Orange County. Marker can be reached from Temple Hill Road (New York State Route 300), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located at the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: New Windsor NY 12553, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "The Publick Building Called the Temple" (a few steps from this marker); The People of the New Windsor Cantonment (a few steps from this marker); Unknown Soldier (a few steps from this marker); Revolutionary Hut (within shouting distance of this marker); New Windsor Cantonment (within shouting distance of this marker); Temple Hill (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Land (about 300 feet away); Purple Heart Memorial (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Windsor.
 
Also see . . .
1. New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site. New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation website. (Submitted on June 10, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. History of the Society of the Cincinnati. The Society of the Cincinnati. (Submitted on June 10, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Right Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
3. Right Side of Monument
Back of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
4. Back of Monument
Left Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
5. Left Side of Monument
Reconstructed Temple image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
6. Reconstructed Temple
In April of 1783, General Washington informed his Army of the Peace Treaty marking the official end of the Revolutionary War. This "Proclamation of the Cessation of Hostilities" was read to the troops from this Temple.
Interior of the Temple of Virtue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
7. Interior of the Temple of Virtue
In this Temple, Gen. Washington was able to defuse a mutiny of his Army with a passionate appeal that came to be known as the "Newburgh Address".
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 10, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,093 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on June 10, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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