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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Schools For Freedmen

 
 
Schools For Freedmen Marker image. Click for full size.
By R. E. Smith, March 19, 2008
1. Schools For Freedmen Marker
Inscription. The first free "colored" school in the city was opened in early 1863 in a barrack building in South Memphis. In 1864 the U.S. Army issued a general order authorizing its officers to help with these schools for the education of freedmen. In 1865 there were 9 schools here. All were burned during the May 1866 race riot. In 1868-69 there were again 9 schools in operation in various locations in the city. One of these schools was located in this area.
 
Erected 1980 by Shelby County Historical Commission.
 
Location. 35° 8.421′ N, 90° 3.278′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street and Beale Street, on the right when traveling north on South Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Memphis TN 38103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lansky Brothers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hooks Brothers Photography (about 700 feet away); The Blues Trail From Mississippi to Memphis (approx. 0.2 miles away); Beale Street Historic District (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ida B. Wells
Schools For Freedmen Marker image. Click for full size.
By R. E. Smith, March 19, 2008
2. Schools For Freedmen Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); WDIA (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pee Wee Saloon (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rufus Thomas, Jr. (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Memphis.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsEducation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 19, 2008, by R. E. Smith of Nashville, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 1,199 times since then and 35 times this year. Last updated on May 3, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 19, 2008, by R. E. Smith of Nashville, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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