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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arambala, Morazán, El Salvador — Central America (West Coast)
 

El Mozote Children's Memorial

Jardín de Reflexión Los Inocentes

 
 
El Mozote Children's Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, April 12, 2015
1. El Mozote Children's Memorial Marker
Inscription. En este lugar se encontraron en 1992 los restos de 146 personas, 140 menores de 12 años. Todos ellos se encuentran enterrados ahora en el monumento
El Mozote Nunca Mas

English translation:
In this place in 1992 were recovered the remains of 146 people, 140 of them under 12 years old. All of them now are buried in the monument.
El Mozote Never Again
 
Location. 13° 53.906′ N, 88° 6.884′ W. Marker is in Arambala, Morazán. Touch for map.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 23 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. El Mozote (within shouting distance of this marker); Peugeot armored car (approx. 8.4 kilometers away); French and Mexican recognition (approx. 8.5 kilometers away); 75 mm cannon (approx. 8.5 kilometers away); 120 mm mortar (approx. 8.5 kilometers away); Direct strike against the Counter-Insurgency Plan (approx. 8.5 kilometers away); Oscar Romero Park (approx. 22.4 kilometers away in San Miguel); First Century of Ciudad Barrios (approx. 22.5 kilometers away in San Miguel).
 
Also see . . .  The Truth of El Mozote. Mark Danner provides his 1993 in-depth New Yorker article on the massacre: ...By early 1992, when a peace agreement between the government and
Wide view of El Mozote Children's Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, April 12, 2015
2. Wide view of El Mozote Children's Memorial Marker
The building in the background is the reconstructed Catholic church of El Mozote. Tiles with the names of the children found here are located along the base of the church.
the guerrillas was finally signed, Americans had spent more than four billion dollars funding a civil war that had lasted twelve years and left seventy-five thousand Salvadorans dead. By then, of course, the bitter fight over El Mozote had largely been forgotten; Washington had turned its gaze to other places and other things. For most Americans, El Salvador had long since slipped back into obscurity. But El Mozote may well have been the largest massacre in modern Latin-American history. That in the United States it came to be known, that it was exposed to the light and then allowed to fall back into the dark, makes the story of El Mozote — how it came to happen and how it came to be denied — a central parable of the Cold War....
(Submitted on May 12, 2015.) 
 
Categories. War, Cold
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 11, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 573 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 11, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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