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Collinwood in Wayne County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Divided Loyalties

Wayne County during the Civil War

 
 
Divided Loyalties Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
1. Divided Loyalties Marker
Inscription. The residents of Wayne County supported the Union almost unanimously until the fighting began. After the Confederate bombardment of Fort Sumter in April 1861, the majority in the northern portion of the county shifted their allegiance to the Confederacy, while most residents of the southern portion remained loyal to the Union. Both sides raised companies during the war. The first companies supporting the Confederacy became part of Col. Jacob B. Biffle’s 9th Tennessee Cavalry. Local Unionists joined Co. A, 10th Tennessee Cavalry at first and later formed the 2nd Tennessee Mounted Infantry under Col. John Murphy.

Each side attempted to protect its supporters from the other. A number of skirmishes occurred near the town of Clifton, a well-known crossing point of the Tennessee River. Confederate conscription officers often recruited in the area. A Federal gunboat commander patrolling the river discovered a conscription gathering at Carrollville on the night of March 23, 1863, and ordered his men to shell the town.

Although no major military action took place here during the war, Wayne County experienced two large-scale troop movements. In April 1862, Union Gen. Don Carlos Buell’s Army of the Ohio marched across the country on its way to reinforce Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s army at Shiloh. In November 1864, Confederate Gen.
Divided Loyalties Marker & Welcome Center Collinwood, Tn image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
2. Divided Loyalties Marker & Welcome Center Collinwood, Tn
John Bell Hood led the Army of Tennessee northward through the country. His campaign ended at Franklin and Nashville.

“I found about 100 rebels… rendezvoused there, conscripting, stealing horses, and stopping movers from leaving the country. I shelled them out of the place, but don’t know what damage was done them. I found a number of carbines and 6 or 8 horses, with saddles and bridles, which I took. I also captured two of the band (Blackburns –father and son).” – Union Lt. Jason Gowdy, commanding USS Robb
 
Erected 2012 by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 10.462′ N, 87° 44.272′ W. Marker is in Collinwood, Tennessee, in Wayne County. Marker is at the intersection of East Broadway Street and 3rd Avenue, on the right when traveling west on East Broadway Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 219 East Broadway Street, Collinwood TN 38450, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. McGlamery Stand (approx. 1.9 miles away); McGlamery's Stand (approx. 2 miles away); Sunken Trace
Confederate recruiting in the countryside image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
3. Confederate recruiting in the countryside
Courtesy Library of Congress
(approx. 4.1 miles away); Army of Tennessee (approx. 5.4 miles away); Sweetwater Branch (approx. 7.1 miles away); Incident at Waynesboro (approx. 10.1 miles away); Sons of Confederate Veterans (approx. 10.1 miles away); Wayne County World War II Memorial (approx. 10.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Collinwood.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Union recruiting station Harper's Weekly, Sept 7, 1861 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
4. Union recruiting station Harper's Weekly, Sept 7, 1861
Map of Wayne Co 1883 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
5. Map of Wayne Co 1883
Courtesy Library of Congress
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 15, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 427 times since then and 19 times this year. Last updated on May 12, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 15, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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