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Lebanon in Wilson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Cedar Grove Cemetery

 
 
Cedar Grove Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Gillard, March 13, 2010
1. Cedar Grove Cemetery Marker
Inscription. In 1846, the City of Lebanon purchased land for this public cemetery. Surveyed by Professor (later Lt. General, CSA) Alexander P. Stewart of Cumberland University, the first burial took place in 1849. Among the dignitaries resting here are William B. Campbell, Governor of Tennessee and Mexican War hero; Robert L. Caruthers, Governor of Tennessee and "Founder of Cumberland University;" General Robert H. Hatton, CSA; and Dixon L. Merritt, journalist and author of the limerick, "The Pelican." Buried here are a few Union veterans and more than 140 Confederate veterans, including James L. Barry (1847 -1947), Tennessee's last surviving Confederate soldier.
 
Erected by TN Historical Commission. (Marker Number 3A 201.)
 
Location. 36° 11.52′ N, 86° 17.69′ W. Marker is in Lebanon, Tennessee, in Wilson County. Marker is on Cumberland Street (U.S. 231), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lebanon TN 37090, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Cedar Grove Cemetery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Wilson County Courthouses (approx. 1.1 miles away); Confederate Veterans and Robert H. Hatton Memorial
Cedar Grove Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Gillard, March 13, 2010
2. Cedar Grove Cemetery Marker
(approx. 1.1 miles away); Battle of Lebanon (approx. 1.1 miles away); Lebanon Post Office (approx. 1.1 miles away); Robert Looney Caruthers (approx. 1.1 miles away); Caruthers Hall (approx. 1.2 miles away); Lebanon (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lebanon.
 
Regarding Cedar Grove Cemetery. Dixon Lanier Merritt (1879 – 1972) was a poet and humorist. He was a newspaper editor for the Tennessean, Nashville's morning paper, and President of the American Press Humorists Association. He penned this well-known limerick in 1910:[1]
A wonderful bird is the pelican,
His bill will hold more than his belican,
He can take in his beak
Enough food for a week
But I'm damned if I see how the helican!
or
A funny old bird is a pelican.
His beak can hold more than his bellican.
Food for a week
He can hold in his beak,
But I don't know how the hellican.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dixon Merritt. (Submitted on March 13, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee.)
2. Gov. William B. Campbell. (Submitted on March 13, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee.)
Cedar Grove Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Gillard, March 13, 2010
3. Cedar Grove Cemetery

3. Gov. Robert L. Caruthers. (Submitted on March 13, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Cedar Grove Cemetery (Civil War Trail Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Chad Comer, April 10, 2015
4. Cedar Grove Cemetery (Civil War Trail Marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 13, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 1,788 times since then and 45 times this year. Last updated on May 12, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 13, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee.   4. submitted on April 10, 2015, by Chad Comer of Gamaliel, Kentucky. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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