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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tucson in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Stork's Nest

 
 
The Stork's Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rachel Aschmann, May 11, 2010
1. The Stork's Nest Marker
Inscription. The Sanborn Fire Maps for the City of Tucson first recorded this building in 1883 as an adobe dwelling with an attached ramada. Between 1901 and 1930 additions were made to the main building and construction was completed on the outbuilding behind you.

The original building was constructed in the indigenous Sonoran style characterized by a flush-fronted adobe facade, a flat mud roof with parapet walls, stone foundations, canales (projecting roof-drains) and a horizontal mass with recessed doorways and windows limited to the bottom half of the exterior walls. Later additions used the prevailing architectural style at the time. The building has elements characteristic of Transformed Sonoran, Early Transitional and Late Transitional architectural styles. A hipped roof and ventilator holes were added early in the 1900s.

Tucson's first maternity ward, the Stork's Nest, was established here in 1922 by Mrs. Helen V. Jacobs. She continued to operate the Stork's Nest until shortly before her death in 1946. A generation of Tucson mothers came to one of three rooms for the then-typical 10-14 day stay. In 1936, the Pink Room, the best of the three, rented for $35; the Blue Room for $30 and the Yellow Room for $25. This included all meals, care and doctor's fees.

In 1947 the building was purchased by Mrs. James Aspell
The Stork's Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rachel Aschmann
2. The Stork's Nest Marker
who undertook a major restoration of the structure. Noted Tucson architect Josias Joestler aided in drafting plans which called for removing the hipped roof over the main building.

The most current restoration was undertaken in 1984 by Southwest Parks and Monuments Association.

This building, located in El Presidio Historic District, is on the National Register of Historic Places.
[Caption] The Stork's Nest, 1926. Photo courtesy of Mr. Larry Confer.
 
Location. 32° 13.489′ N, 110° 58.444′ W. Marker is in Tucson, Arizona, in Pima County. Marker is on North Court Avenue south of West Council Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 223 North Court Avenue, Tucson AZ 85701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Court Street (here, next to this marker); Council Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Siqueiros-Jácome House (within shouting distance of this marker); N.E. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson (within shouting distance of this marker); Meyer Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Presidio Wall & Pithouse
The Stork's Nest Building and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rachel Aschmann, May 11, 2010
3. The Stork's Nest Building and Marker
Marker is located to the left of the window seen next to the gate.
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Leonardo Romero House (about 300 feet away); La Casa Cordova (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tucson.
 
Regarding The Stork's Nest. This transformed Sonoran house in the El Presidio Historic District was home to Tucson’s first maternity ward, from 1922 to 1946. The Stork’s Nest’s office tenants still get visits from people who say they were born there.
 
Additional keywords. Women's history
 
Categories. 20th CenturyScience & Medicine
 
The Stork's Nest Building image. Click for full size.
By Rachel Aschmann, May 11, 2010
4. The Stork's Nest Building
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 26, 2010, by Rachel Aschmann of Camas, Washington. This page has been viewed 1,920 times since then and 228 times this year. Last updated on May 14, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 26, 2010, by Rachel Aschmann of Camas, Washington. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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