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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cedar Bluff in Cherokee County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Cornwall Furnace

 
 
Cornwall Furnace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, March 19, 2011
1. Cornwall Furnace Marker
Inscription. The Confederate States of America in 1862 commissioned the Noble Brothers of Rome, Georgia to erect a cold blast furnace to produce needed pig iron for the war effort.

The skilled labor was detailed from Confederate army personnel. It is estimated that 1000 laborers were employed in building the canal, tunnel and mining brown hematite rock used in building the furnace in less than a year.

The furnace output was small (6 tons daily) but an important asset to the Confederacy in building cannon, carriage and caisson. Some of the first military equipment used in the war was made from Cornwall Iron.

The life of Cornwall was relatively short lived - Gen. Sherman occupying Cedar Bluff and Gaylesville ordered the furnace destroyed in 1864 and on two occasions sent detachments for this purpose but the furnace still stands - perhaps the best preserved stack in the Southeast.

The furnace was put back in operation in 1867 but blown out forever in 1875.
 
Erected 1976 by Cherokee County Historical Society / Cherokee County Soil and Water Conservation District.
 
Location. 34° 14.813′ N, 85° 35.319′ W. Marker is in Cedar Bluff, Alabama, in Cherokee County. Marker can be reached from County
Cornwall Furnace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, March 19, 2011
2. Cornwall Furnace Marker
Road 251. Touch for map. From the junction of Alabama Highway 68 in Cedar Bluff travel east on Alabama Highway 9 for 2 miles. Turn left onto County Road 92, go 1.5 miles to the T intersection. Turn right at the T intersection, travel 1/2 mile to the Cornwall Furnace Memorial Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1200 County Road 251, Cedar Bluff AL 35959, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gen. N.B. Forrest Captured Col. A.D. Streight (approx. 2.9 miles away); Fort Payne Cabin Historic Site (approx. 15.3 miles away); Cherokee Indian Removal (approx. 15.3 miles away); Main Street Historic District (approx. 15.4 miles away); Alabama (approx. 15.5 miles away); Boom Town Historic District (approx. 15.5 miles away); Wills Town Mission (approx. 15.5 miles away); Sequoyah (approx. 15.5 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Cornwall Furnace by the Cherokee County Historical Society. (Submitted on March 20, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
Cornwall Furnace and Marker on the right image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, March 19, 2011
3. Cornwall Furnace and Marker on the right
Cornwall Furnace On the Shores of Lake Weiss image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, March 19, 2011
4. Cornwall Furnace On the Shores of Lake Weiss
Drill marks in the stones that make up Cornwall Furnace image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, March 19, 2011
5. Drill marks in the stones that make up Cornwall Furnace
The heart of Cornwall Furnace image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, March 19, 2011
6. The heart of Cornwall Furnace
This is where the molting iron would accumulate before it is taped to flow out of the furnace into molds.
Lookin up the stack inside the Cornwall Furnace image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, March 19, 2011
7. Lookin up the stack inside the Cornwall Furnace
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 20, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,153 times since then and 71 times this year. Last updated on May 15, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on March 20, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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