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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gadsden in Etowah County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Legend Of Noccalula

 
 
The Legend Of Noccalula Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, September 2, 2007
1. The Legend Of Noccalula Marker
Inscription. White settlers in the hills of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina pushed the Cherokee Indian tribes into North Alabama. The Cherokee in turn encroached upon Creek Territory. There were sporadic battles between the tribes.

Black Creek Falls had long been a trading station and ceremonial ground. Legend is that Noccalula, a beautiful daughter of a Cherokee Chief, had been promised by her father to a Creek sub-chief as an exchange for peace between the Nations. It is related that the princess could not bear to become the wife of a Creek warrior as she loved so deeply a brave of her own tribe.

Instead of being married, on her wedding day she jumped to her death on the rocks of the Black Creek Falls - later to become known as Noccalula Falls. The Indian sign language which is prominently inscribed on the rocks in the Noccalula Falls area confirms that Princess Noccalula did jump to her death at a point near the location of the monument now erected honoring the Indians who once inhabited this area.

It is known definitely that Line Creek and Big Wills Creek to the Coosa River in Etowah County - “and from there as far east as a man could walk in a day” was the boundary line between the Creek and Cherokee Nations at the time white men first came into the territory. The
The Legend Of Noccalula Marker (on the left of by the base of Princess Noccalula Statue) image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr
2. The Legend Of Noccalula Marker (on the left of by the base of Princess Noccalula Statue)
name of the county, Etowah, most of the streams and many of the now existing community names were contributed by the Indians. The land plats throughout portions of the county are described on both sides of Big Wills Creek to this respected boundary line. There is much irregularity in the property plats as the lines meander along the banks of the steams.

This monument dedicated in honor of the first Americans and the heritage of our People.

This 21st Day of September, 1969, A. D.
 
Erected 1969.
 
Location. 34° 2.443′ N, 86° 1.277′ W. Marker is in Gadsden, Alabama, in Etowah County. Marker can be reached from Noccalula Road (State Road 211). Touch for map. Marker located in the Noccalula Falls Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1600 Noccalula Road, Gadsden AL 35904, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Etowah County War Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Emma Sansom (approx. 1.4 miles away); a different marker also named Emma Sansom (approx. 1.4 miles away); Howard Gardner Nichols 1871-1896 (approx. 1.7 miles away); William Luther Sibert Major General U.S. Army (Ret.)
The Legend Of Noccalula Marker and Statue at Noccalula Falls image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, December 18, 2010
3. The Legend Of Noccalula Marker and Statue at Noccalula Falls
(approx. 1.7 miles away); Dwight Mill Village (approx. 1.8 miles away); Etowah County, Alabama (approx. 1.8 miles away); Eleventh Street School (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gadsden.
 
Also see . . .  Noccalula Falls Park Website. (Submitted on November 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Princess Noccalula Statue and the Noccalula Falls image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr
4. Princess Noccalula Statue and the Noccalula Falls
Noccalula Falls image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr
5. Noccalula Falls
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,769 times since then and 88 times this year. Last updated on May 26, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   3. submitted on December 21, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   4, 5. submitted on November 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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