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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maysville in Mason County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Paxton Inn

 
 
Paxton Inn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 10, 2015
1. Paxton Inn Marker
Inscription.
The property upon which this Inn stands
was acquired by
James A. Paxton in 1810.
Paxton and subsequent nineteenth century
owners of this building operated it as an Inn.
Lawyers and townspeople gathered here.

In 1918, the Mason County Mutual Telephone
Company purchased the site. For the next 49 years,
various telephone businesses owned this property.

In 1967 ownership of the building passed
to the Limestone Heritage Foundation, Inc.,
agents for the Limestone Chapter, Daughters
of the American Revolution. In 1997 ownership
was transferred to Limestone Chapter, DAR.
Since 1967, the Chapter has used the Inn as
a museum and Chapter house.

 
Erected 1999 by Limestone Chapter, DAR.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 38° 36.969′ N, 83° 48.51′ W. Marker is in Maysville, Kentucky, in Mason County. Marker is at the intersection of Paxton Street and Old Main Street (Kentucky Route 2515), on the left when traveling east on Paxton Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2028 Old Main Street, Maysville KY 41056, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Paxton Inn image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 10, 2015
2. The Paxton Inn
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston (within shouting distance of this marker); "Washington Courthouse Site" (within shouting distance of this marker); Johnston Birthplace (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Mefford's Fort (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Early Stage-Mail Route (approx. 0.2 miles away); Washington Baptist Church Cemetery / Washington Baptist Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Joseph Desha (1768-1842) / Old Court-New Court Issue (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Maysville.
 
Also see . . .  Use of the Paxton Inn on the Underground Railroad. (Submitted on June 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Paxton Inn & the Underground Railroad
The Paxton Inn was a station on the Underground Railroad when owned by Mr. James A. Paxton. There is a hidden stairway between the first and second stories of this brick structure. There runaway slaves could be hidden until they could be safely moved across the Ohio River at night under the cover of darkness. The Underground Railroad was a path that led thousands of slaves from the South to the North to freedom. Over 2,000 slaves crossed the Ohio
Paxton Inn Marker around corner from main marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 10, 2015
3. Paxton Inn Marker around corner from main marker.
1810
Paxton Inn

A favorite meeting place for visitors and citizens
to discuss politics and other issues of the day,
including slavery. The Kentucky Telephone Company
opened an exchange in the old inn after it passed
through several owners. In 1966 the telephone company
presented the building to the Limestone Heritage
Foundation. Restoration of the building was led by the
Limestone Chapter of the Daughters of the American
Revolution.
River from Kentucky to the safe haven of Ohio.
    — Submitted June 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRColonial EraNotable Buildings
 
Paxton Inn sign at front door. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 10, 2015
4. Paxton Inn sign at front door.
PAXTON
INN
— Circa 1810 —

Limestone Chapter
NSDAR
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 307 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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