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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Benjamin Albert Imes

 
 
Benjamin Albert Imes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, May 28, 2015
1. Benjamin Albert Imes Marker
Inscription. Described as the best-educated minister in all of Memphis in 1880 was a black man, the Rev. Benjamin A. Imes, who was a noted city leader. Imes held two degrees from Oberlin College and was involved with an influential group that pushed for the integration of public facilities in Memphis during the late 19th century. The group met with its demise during the race riots of the 1880s. Imes was a minister of Second Congregational Church, founded in 1868.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 4E 100.)
 
Location. 35° 7.173′ N, 90° 2.177′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is at the intersection of Walker Avenue and Porter Street, on the left when traveling east on Walker Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 762 Walker Avenue, Memphis TN 38126, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Second Congregational Church (here, next to this marker); Hollis Freeman Price, Sr. (a few steps from this marker); Edward Shaw (within shouting distance of this marker); The University of West Tennessee (approx. 0.3 miles away);
Benjamin Albert Imes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, May 28, 2015
2. Benjamin Albert Imes Marker
Elmwood Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); Captain Kit Dalton (approx. 0.6 miles away); Confederate Soldiers Rest (approx. 0.6 miles away); Lucie Eddie Campbell (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Memphis.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.Civil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 16, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 193 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 16, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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