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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hohenwald in Lewis County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Meriwether Lewis: Life Compass

 
 
Meriwether Lewis: Life Compass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
1. Meriwether Lewis: Life Compass Marker
Inscription. In 1809, renowned explorer Meriwether Lewis traveled up the Old Natchez Trace on his way to Washington, D.C. He stopped here at an inn called Grinder’s Stand, and died during the night.

What is a Compass Rose?
A compass rose is a symbol that appears on maps to show the four cardinal directions: north, south, east, and west. The compass rose on this trail shows some of the important “directions” in Meriwether Lewis’ life.

Footsteps of the Past
This trail will lead you to a preserved section of the historic Natchez Trace, where you may follow in Meriwether Lewis’ footsteps and those of countless other travelers through time.

Pittsburgh, PA
Lewis joined the U.S. Militia in 1784 to help suppress the Whiskey Rebellion in Pittsburgh.

Washington, D.C.
Lewis was on his way to Washington, D.C. to address disputed charges he’d made as governor.

Virginia
Lewis was born in Albemarle County, Virginia in 1774.

Georgia
Lewis spent part of his childhood in Georgia attending school.

Gulf of Mexico
In 1809 Lewis initially planned to sail through the Gulf of Mexico and up the Atlantic Ocean to Washington, D.C., but he decided to avoid the British warships.

New Orleans,
Marker and Meriwether Lewis<br>Exploring America Life Compass image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
2. Marker and Meriwether Lewis
Exploring America Life Compass
LA

Days before his death, Lewis was heading down the Mississippi River to New Orleans but decided to change his route and take the Old Natchez Trace to Washington, D.C.

Fort Pickering, TN
While traveling to Washington, D.C. Lewis stopped at Fort Pickering, near present-day Memphis, Tennessee.

Oregon
As co-leader of the Corps of Discovery expedition, Lewis’ final destination was the Pacific Ocean.

St. Louis, MO
After the Corps of Discovery expedition, Lewis moved to St. Louis to preside as governor of the Upper Louisiana Territory.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Natchez Trace marker series.
 
Location. 35° 30.459′ N, 87° 27.535′ W. Marker is near Hohenwald, Tennessee, in Lewis County. Marker can be reached from Natchez Trace Parkway (at milepost 385.9), 0.2 miles north of Summertown Highway (Tennessee Route 20), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located near the main parking area at the Meriwether Lewis Site on the Natchez Trace. Marker is in this post office area: Hohenwald TN 38462, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Natchez Trace – Early American Trail (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Grinder House
Meriwether Lewis: Life Compass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
3. Meriwether Lewis: Life Compass Marker
Located near main parking area of Meriwether Lewis Site
(about 700 feet away); Natchez Trace (approx. 0.2 miles away); Meriwether Lewis (approx. 0.3 miles away); Metal Ford (approx. 3.2 miles away); Steele's Iron Works (approx. 3.3 miles away); Phosphate Mine (approx. 4.5 miles away); Civil War in Lewis County (approx. 6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hohenwald.
 
Also see . . .  Natchez Trace. Official National Park Service website. (Submitted on June 23, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Map of Meriwether Lewis Site on the Natchez Trace image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
4. Map of Meriwether Lewis Site on the Natchez Trace
Meriwether Lewis Exploring America<br>Life Compass image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 4, 2015
5. Meriwether Lewis Exploring America
Life Compass
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 23, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 213 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 23, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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