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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

New York’s Municipal Slave Market

 
 
New York’s Municipal Slave Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 2, 2015
1. New York’s Municipal Slave Market Marker
Inscription.
On Wall Street, between Pearl and Water Streets, a market that auctioned enslaved people of African ancestry was established by a Common Council law on November 30, 1711. This slave market was in use until 1762. Slave owners wanting to hire out their enslaved workers, which included people of Native American ancestry, as day laborers also had to do so at this location. In 1726 the structure was renamed the Meal Market because corn, grain and meal – crucial ingredients to the Colonial diet – were also exclusively traded there.

Slavery was introduced to Manhattan in 1626. By the mid-18th century approximately one in five people living in New York City was enslaved and almost half of Manhattan households included at least one slave. Although New York State abolished slavery in 1827, complete abolition came only in 1841 when the State of New York abolished the rights of non-residents to have slaves in the state for up to nine months. However, the use of slave labor elsewhere for the production of raw materials such as sugar and cotton was essential to the economy of New York both before and after the Civil War. Slaves also cleared forest land for the construction of Broadway and were among the workers that built the wall that Wall Street is named for and helped build the first Trinity Church. Within months of the market’s
New York’s Municipal Slave Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 2, 2015
2. New York’s Municipal Slave Market Marker
construction, New York’s first slave uprising occurred a few blocks away on Maiden Lane, led by enslaved people from Coromantee and Pawpaw people of Ghana.
 
Erected by NYC Parks.
 
Location. 40° 42.306′ N, 74° 0.429′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Wall Street and Water Street, on the right when traveling west on Wall Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Wall Street, New York NY 10005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Clinton (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Precinct Police Station (about 600 feet away); India House / British Memorial Garden in Hanover Square (about 600 feet away); Brooklyn (about 600 feet away); 100 Old Slip - New York City Police Museum (about 700 feet away); Bank of New York and & Trust Company Building (about 700 feet away); Andries Rees’s Tavern (about 800 feet away); 48 Wall Street / 40 Wall Street (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. The right of the marker contains a picture with the caption “Artist’s rendering, modified detail from The Burgis View, c. 1719-21,
Marker on Wall Street image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 2, 2015
3. Marker on Wall Street
New York Public Library.”
 
Categories. African AmericansColonial Era
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 2, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 258 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 2, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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