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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Athens in Central Athens Regional Unit, Attica Region, Greece
 

The Erechtheion

 
 
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
1. The Erechtheion Marker
Inscription. English Text:

The elegant building of the Ionic order is called, according to later literary sources, Erechtheion from the name of Erechtheus, the mythical king of Athens. The construction started before the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War (431 B.C.) or after the conclusion of the "peace of Nikias" (421 B.C.) and was finished in 406 B.C., after the interruption of the works because of the war.

The peculiar plan of the building is due to the natural irregularity of the ground and the need to house the ancient sacred spots: the salt spring, which appeared when Poseidon struck the rock with his trident during the contest with Athena over the patronage of the city, the trident marks and the tombs of the Athenian kings Kekrops and Erechtheus.

The Erechtheion consists of a rectangular cella divided by an interior wall forming two sections. The eastern section, which was at a level at least 3 meters higher than that of the western, was dedicated to Athena Polias and housed the xoanon, the ancient wooden cult statue of the goddess. The western section was divided into three parts and was dedicated to the cult of Poseidon-Erechtheus, Hephaistus and the hero Boutes.

At the north side of the cells there is a magnificent porch with 6 Ionic columns. The bases and capitals along
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
2. The Erechtheion Marker
View of the marker, with a view of the copied Caryatids directly behind the marker.
with the frame of the doorway leading to the interior of the cella, have elaborate relief decoration, while the ceiling coffers were painted. The famous Porch of the Maidens (Korai) or Caryatids dominates the south side of the building: six statues of young women, standing on a podium 1.77 meters high, support the roof of the porch, which was part of Kekrops' tomb above the ground.

At the upper part of the building is a frieze of grey Eleusinian stone to which relief figures of white Parian marble were attached. Today they are exhibited in the Acropolis Museum.

Around the end of the 1st century B.C. the Erechtheion was repaired after a fire. During the Christian period it was transformed into a church, while in the Ottoman period it was used as a house. In the first years of the 19th century Lord Elgin carried off the third Caryatid from the west (Kore C) and the column of the northeast corner of the building. Today they have been replaced by copies, as well as the rest of the Caryatids.
 
Location. 37° 58.317′ N, 23° 43.598′ E. Marker is in Athens, Attica Region, in Central Athens Regional Unit. Marker can be reached from Theorias Street north of Dionysiou Areopagitou Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. This marker is part of the archaeological park
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
3. The Erechtheion Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the restored plan of the Erechtheion.
that is located at the Acropolis of Athens, very near the structure named the Erechtheion. Marker is in this post office area: Athens, Attica Region 21 0321 417, Greece.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The "Old Temple" of Athena (within shouting distance of this marker); The Parthenon (within shouting distance of this marker); A. The Sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia, B. The Chalkotheke (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Statue of Athena Promachos (about 90 meters away); A. The Propylaia, B. The Shrine of Athena Hygieia and Hygieia (about 90 meters away); Areopagus Hill (approx. 0.3 kilometers away in Attica Periphery); The Acropolis of Athens (approx. 0.3 kilometers away in Attica Periphery).
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
4. The Erechtheion Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the east elevation of the Erechtheion.
The Erechtheion image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
5. The Erechtheion
View of the east elevation of the Erechtheion.
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
6. The Erechtheion Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing the west elevation of the Erechtheion.
The Erechtheion image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
7. The Erechtheion
View of the west elevation of the Erechtheion.
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
8. The Erechtheion Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration (made in 1805), showing the Erechtheion, from the southwest, and showing that the Caryatid, that had been carried off by Lord Elgin, had been replaced by a column.
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
9. The Erechtheion Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photo, showing the original 5 statues of the Caryatids.
The Erechtheion image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
10. The Erechtheion
View of the copied Caryatids that are presently being used as replacements for the original statues of the Caryatids at the Erechtheion.
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
11. The Erechtheion Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an Orthophotomosaic, showing where the Acropolis visitor is in relation to the ruins of the archaeological park, while standing in front of the marker.
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
12. The Erechtheion Marker
View showing where the marker is situated in relation to the Acropolis ruins.
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
13. The Erechtheion Marker
View showing where the marker is situated in relation to the Erechtheion.
The Erechtheion image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
14. The Erechtheion
A distant view of the Erechtheion in the midst of the Acropolis ruins.
The Erechtheion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 23, 2015
15. The Erechtheion Marker
A panoramic view of the ruins of the Acropolis, including the Erechtheion.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 8, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 258 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. submitted on July 8, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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