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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mooresville in Limestone County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Mooresville Brick Church/The Cumberland Presbyterian Church

 
 
Mooresville Brick Church Marker (side 1) image. Click for full size.
By sandra Hughes, August 25, 2009
1. Mooresville Brick Church Marker (side 1)
Inscription. (side 1)
Mooresville Brick Church
Completed by 1839 this Greek Revival Structure was probably under construction for several years. On November 18, 1838 Alabama's 2nd Governor, Thomas Bibb and his wife Pamela deeded this property to William K. Adams, Monroe F. Moses and James Allison trustees of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. This denomination retained title but over the years permitted the Baptist and Methodist to meet here.

Outstanding religious leaders who preached here were Cumberland Presbyterians "Father" Robert Donnell, the early leader and Constantine Blackmon Sanders, the "X+Y=Z Preacher" as well as Methodist Clare Purcell later Bishop of the North Ala., West Fla. and Central Conferences.
National Register of Historic Places
Mooresville Historic District 4/13/72
(side 2)
The Cumberland Presbyterian Church
This faith was organized in Dickson County, Tenn., Feb. 4, 1810, as an outgrowth of the Great Religious Revival of 1800. Its founders were ministers of the Presbyterian Church who rejected the doctrine of election and reprobation. They formulated and published a “Brief Statement” setting forth the points wherein Cumberland Presbyterians dissented from the Westminster Confession of Faith.

Robert
The Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker (side 2) image. Click for full size.
By sandra Hughes, August 25, 2009
2. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker (side 2)
Donnell, one of the founding fathers of the church, was preaching in this area as early as 1810. About 1834 he moved from Tenn. to Mooresville and was largely responsible for the early growth of the faith locally.

ary Ann Walton, a local benefactor, died in 1899 willing much of her estate in trust to the Presbytery. Her will was contested and upheld three times by the Ala. Supreme Court in Woodroof vs. Hundley.
 
Erected 1972 by Alabama Historical Commission.
 
Location. 34° 37.591′ N, 86° 52.768′ W. Marker is in Mooresville, Alabama, in Limestone County. Marker is at the intersection of Lauderdale Street and East Street (County Route 71), on the right when traveling west on Lauderdale Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mooresville AL 35649, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mooresville, Alabama / Mooresville Stagecoach Inn and Tavern (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Mooresville (about 400 feet away); Cottonport / Mooresville (about 400 feet away); Belle Mina / Woodside (approx. 1.2 miles away); Druid's Grove Plantation / Jones-Donnell Cemetery
Mooresville Brick Church/The Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 18, 2011
3. Mooresville Brick Church/The Cumberland Presbyterian Church Marker
(approx. 3½ miles away); Southeast Air Forces Training Center (approx. 4.2 miles away); Oakland United Methodist Church (approx. 4.6 miles away); Gen. Jos. Wheeler (approx. 5.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mooresville.
 
Also see . . .  Old Brick Church. Town of Mooresville (Submitted on July 15, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Mooresville Brick Church image. Click for full size.
By sandra Hughes, August 25, 2009
4. Mooresville Brick Church
The Cumberland Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 18, 2011
5. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 4, 2010, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 1,152 times since then and 68 times this year. Last updated on July 14, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 4, 2010, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   3. submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4. submitted on March 4, 2010, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   5. submitted on September 25, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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