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Ranchester in Sheridan County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Connor Battlefield

Wyoming

 
 
Connor Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
1. Connor Battlefield Marker
Inscription.
† † † At this site on Tongue River, August 29, 1865, Brigadier General Patrick E. Connor. 125 cavalrymen, and 90 Indian scouts attacked an Arapaho village of several hundred lodges. After a swift night march, Connorís men surprised and stormed the village. As women and children fled, the men held off the troopers before withdrawing. Connor galloped in pursuit while Pawnee scouts rounded up the Arapaho horse herd and soldiers destroyed the village. When the Arapahos launched an aggressive counterattack, the army command retreated down the Tongue. Only their howitzers prevented the outnumbered soldiers from suffering serious casualties. Although Connor claimed his troops killed 35 Arapahos, the actual number of killed and wounded among the Indians is unknown. Seven army men were injured. The Battle of Tongue River ended with Connorís withdrawal from the field under fire – hardly a victory although it inflicted serious damage upon, and outraged, the Arapaho. It resolved nothing.

† † † In April 1865 the Civil War ended at Appomattox. The nationís focus turned to the Far West. Responding to Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho resistance to white travel through Indian hunting lands and traffic on the Bozeman Trail, Connor launched an expedition of three separate columns into Powder River country. They struggled in an inhospitable
Connor Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
2. Connor Battlefield Marker
land, far from supply bases. The expensive campaign failed, emboldening rather than discouraging Indians. Nevertheless, fighting this battle, establishing Fort Connor (later renamed Reno) on the Powder River, and focusing attention on the Bozeman Trail, the expedition encouraged emigrant traffic. This sparked twelve more years of warfare that ended only with the campaigns following Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custerís 1876 defeat on the Little Bighorn, when the army ultimately won control of these lands for the United States.
 
Location. 44° 54.526′ N, 107° 9.833′ W. Marker is in Ranchester, Wyoming, in Sheridan County. Marker is at the intersection of Dayton Street (U.S. 14) and Gillette Street, on the right when traveling east on Dayton Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ranchester WY 82839, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ranchester (approx. 0.2 miles away); Connor Battlefield State Historic Site (approx. ľ mile away); Connor Battlefield State Park (approx. ľ mile away); The Battle of Tongue River (approx. 0.3 miles away); Bozeman Trail (approx. 3.4 miles away); Stagecoach Roads in Sheridan County
Connor Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
3. Connor Battlefield Marker
(approx. 3.4 miles away); Tongue River Crossing (approx. 3.4 miles away); First Woman Mayor in Wyoming (approx. 5.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ranchester.
 
Categories. Wars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 24, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 246 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 24, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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