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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Falls Church, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fairfax Chapel

 
 
Fairfax Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 12, 2007
1. Fairfax Chapel Marker
Inscription. Circuit riders brought Methodism to area in the late 1700s, holding meetings in homes. Fairfax Circuit initiated in 1776. Clapboard chapel built in 1779 and enlarged in 1798 on acre of land donated in 1818 by heirs of George Minor (a part of 1731 271-acre T. Harrison grant). Larger red brick structure built in 1819. Services suspended in 1861; Union soldiers demolished chapel using bricks for fireplaces. Site abandoned by Methodists after war, but surrounding Oakwood Cemetery remains. In 1885, four acres were deeded for private cemetery use. In 1915, U.S. Government paid $1,600 for chapel reparation.
 
Erected by City of Falls Church.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia, City of Falls Church marker series.
 
Location. 38° 52.553′ N, 77° 9.435′ W. Marker is in Falls Church, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of North Roosevelt Street and Ridge Plaza, on the right when traveling east on North Roosevelt Street. Touch for map. Located at the entrance to Oakwood Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Falls Church VA 22046, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Taylor’s Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Falls Church
Entrance to Oakwood Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 12, 2007
2. Entrance to Oakwood Cemetery
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Taylor’s Tavern (about 500 feet away); Tallwood (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dulin Methodist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fort Buffalo (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wren’s Tavern (approx. half a mile away); SW No. 9 Mile Marker (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Falls Church.
 
Also see . . .  Photographs of Oakwood Cemetery. Comparing the photograph from 1900 to one from 2000. (Submitted on October 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Text of additional nearby Fairfax Chapel marker (Photos 3 and 5)
Caption:“Black Harry” Hosier discovered preaching to the Negroes at Fairfax Chapel.

Fairfax Chapel
This was the site of Fairfax Chapel, an early Methodist church, built ca. 1779 and began about 1773 in the William Adam´s home, 1.5 miles south. Bishop Asbury often preached here. His journal of May 13, 1781, records the first Methodist sermon
Site of Fairfax Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 12, 2007
3. Site of Fairfax Chapel
A separate marker, placed by the United Methodist Church, stands in front of the chapel's old cemetery.
by a Negro, his servant Harry Hosier. After a service in the chapel, “Harry, a black man, spoke. This circumstance was new and the white people looked on with attention.”

The chapel, rebuilt in 1819 of brick, was destroyed in 1862 by Union troops who used the bricks for chimneys in their winter quarters in nearby Ft. Buffalo (now Seven Corners). After the Civil War the congregation divided into what became Dulin and Crossman Churches.

Methodist Historical Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted July 26, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Old Chapel Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 12, 2007
4. Old Chapel Cemetery
Several of the grave stones still stand.
United Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 12, 2007
5. United Methodist Church Marker
Only portions of the Methodist Church marker at the site are legible.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,044 times since then and 45 times this year. Last updated on July 26, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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