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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Beallsville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Seneca Stone Barn

 
 
Seneca Stone Barn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2015
1. Seneca Stone Barn Marker
Inscription.

Restoring History

This circa 1800 stable was built either by the Young family or the Fisher family of Seneca sandstone most likely quarried nearby on the Potomac River. Seneca stone was prized for its ruddy variegated color, local abundance, and durability. A stable built of stone was truly exceptional because the vast majority of agricultural buildings in Montgomery County were made of wood.

Today, this restored facility stands as the centerpiece of the 418 acre parcel Mr. Herman Greenberg donated to the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission in 1999 for equestrian pursuits.

Sheltering Horses

Maintenance of horses requires a special shelter: a barn or stable. The term "stable" became associated with horses in the 18th century. Stables were built for racing and hunting clubs, the military, commercial enterprises, urban residences and farms.

Of all common livestock, horses seemed to be most susceptible to disease, so their health was the first consideration in stable design. Horses had long been kept in dark and damp quarters, but in the early 1800s owners came to recognize the importance of proper drainage and a balance of light and air with shelter from cold winds. Other considerations included the height of the horses, the number of animals
Seneca Stone Barn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
2. Seneca Stone Barn Marker
to be sheltered, and the local climate.

Whether built of wood, masonry, or brick, the expense of construction a horse barn or stable demonstrated a considerable investment. This Seneca Stone Barn is a rare example of a traditional British-style horse barn — one of a very few still standing in the mid-Atlantic region.
 
Erected by Woodstock Equestirian Park, Project Open Space.
 
Location. 39° 11.205′ N, 77° 26.614′ W. Marker is in Beallsville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Wasche Road. Touch for map. Along the Stone Barn Loop trail off the Farm Road Trail, an unpaved road that begins at 20101 Wasche Road. An identical marker can be found at the parking lot of the Moritz Greenberg Equestrian Center at 20207 Darnestown Road. (GPS: 39.194798, -77.427412). Marker is in this post office area: Beallsville MD 20839, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Linden Farm (approx. 0.8 miles away); Washington's Farm (approx. 1.1 miles away); Brewer Farmstead (approx. 1.3 miles away); Equestrian Heritage (approx. 1.3 miles away); African American Soldiers from Montgomery County
Workers at the Seneca Stone Mill around 1890 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2015
3. Workers at the Seneca Stone Mill around 1890
Close-up of photo on marker
(approx. 1.4 miles away); White’s Ford (approx. 1½ miles away); a different marker also named White's Ford (approx. 1.6 miles away); In Loving Memory (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Beallsville.
 
Categories. AgricultureMan-Made Features
 
Deteriorated, Unstable and Dangerous image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2015
4. Deteriorated, Unstable and Dangerous
In 2003 during a site assessment. the barn was judged "extremely deteriorated, structurally unstable, and potentially dangerous" but also an historic treasure worth preserving.
Close-up of photo on marker
Stone Barn during restoration in 2009. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2015
5. Stone Barn during restoration in 2009.
Close-up of photo on marker
J. R. F. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2015
6. J. R. F.
Can you locate the initials "J.R.F." on the front of the stable? These initials were carved by Joseph Fisher whose father, Martin Fisher, bought this acreage in 1824 from William Young.
Close-up of photo on marker
Horse Barn at Hayfields image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2015
7. Horse Barn at Hayfields
Drawings of the Brick Horse Barn at Hayfields in Cockeysville, Maryland, similar in design to the Seneca Stone Barn here at Woodstock.
Close-up of HABS drawing on marker
J. R. F. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
8. J. R. F.
Seneca Stone Barn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
9. Seneca Stone Barn
Seneca Stone Barn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
10. Seneca Stone Barn
Seneca Stone Barn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2015
11. Seneca Stone Barn Marker
Identical marker at the Greenburg Equestrian Center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 28, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 246 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on July 28, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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