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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anahuac in Chambers County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Fort Anahuac

 
 
Fort Anahuac Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, August 1, 2015
1. Fort Anahuac Marker
Inscription. On this site first known as Perry's Point, a fort, established in 1830 by General Manuel Mier y Terán for the purpose of halting Anglo-American colonization was named Anahuac, the Aztec name of Mexico City, then the capital of Texas. The imprisonment here of settlers in Austin's colony brought the first open rebellion to Mexican rule in 1832.
 
Erected 1936 by The State of Texas. (Marker Number 9124.)
 
Location. 29° 45.362′ N, 94° 41.288′ W. Marker is in Anahuac, Texas, in Chambers County. Marker can be reached from Unnamed roads within the park near Unnamed roads within the park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Anahuac TX 77514, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Robert McAlpin Williamson (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Anahuac (within shouting distance of this marker); William Barret Travis (within shouting distance of this marker); Juan Davis Bradburn (within shouting distance of this marker); Round Point (approx. 1.5 miles away); Birthplace of Governor Ross Shaw Sterling (1875-1949)
Fort Anahuac Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, August 1, 2015
2. Fort Anahuac Marker
(approx. 3.2 miles away); Turtle Bayou Resolutions (approx. 6 miles away); Chambers County Youth Project Show (approx. 6.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anahuac.
 
Regarding Fort Anahuac. Conflict surrounding this fort lit the fuse for the Texas War of Independence from Mexico. See "Turtle Bayou Resolutions" marker.



Anahuac was the Mexican capital at the time of what later became the Republic of Texas.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Handbook of Texas. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. From the Texas Almanac. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. From. (Submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, Texas Independence
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 232 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 1, 2015, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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