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Crow Agency in Big Horn County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Cheyenne Warrior Markers

Little Bighorn Battlefield

 
 
Cheyenne Warrior Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 23, 2015
1. Cheyenne Warrior Markers Marker
Inscription.
After the battle, Sioux and Cheyenne removed their dead and buried them in tipis, scaffolds, and adjacent hillsides in the Little Bighorn valley. Southern Cheyenne Chief “Ve’ho’enohnenehe” (Lame White Man) and Northern Cheyenne “Nestonevahtsestse” (Noisy Walking) fell below this ridge during the battle. Their families erected stone cairns to commemorate the casualty site of their loved ones.

In 1916 Sioux and Cheyenne battle veterans showed Cheyenne historian John Stands in Timber the cairns and he in turn showed them to Don Rickey, Jr., Custer Battlefield Chief Historian in 1956. In 1958 the National Park Service erected a wooden sign along the ridge to identify the site of Lame White Man’s death. On June 25, 1999, red granite markers were erected by the NPS adjacent to the cairns as fitting memorials and to help visitor understanding of known warrior casualty sites during the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Young men, come now with me and show your selves to be brave.”
- Lame White Man, Southern Cheyenne, June 25, 1876

The soldiers were on the high ground and [in] one of the first charges we made, a Cheyenne Chief named White Man Cripple [Lame White Man] was killed.”
- Waterman, Northern Arapaho

He [Noisy
Cheyenne Warrior Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 23, 2015
2. Cheyenne Warrior Markers Marker
Walking] was lying on a ground bed of buffalo robes under a willow shelter . . . . I asked my friend ‘How are you?’ He replied ‘Good only I want water.’ I did not know what else to say but wanted him to know I was his friend and willing to do whatever I could for him . . . . I said you were very brave
.”
- Wooden Leg, Northern Cheyenne

 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 45° 34.051′ N, 107° 25.441′ W. Marker is in Crow Agency, Montana, in Big Horn County. Marker is on Little Bighorn Battlefield Road. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Little Bighorn Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Crow Agency MT 59022, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Keogh – Crazy Horse Fight (a few steps from this marker); Companies F and I (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Deep Ravine (about 800 feet away); Last Stand Hill, June 25, 1876 (approx. ¼ mile away); Memorial Markers (approx. ¼ mile away); Companies C & E (approx. ¼ mile away); Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (approx. ¼ mile away); Indian Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Crow Agency.
 
More about this marker.
Marker on the Little Bighorn Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 23, 2015
3. Marker on the Little Bighorn Battlefield
Several photographs appear on the marker. One depicts “Chief Lame White Man in Washington, D.C. November 1873. Courtesy of the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.” In another, you see “John Stands in Timber, standing proudly before his Grandfather Lame White Man’s wooden marker, erected by the NPS on Battle Ridge. Photograph courtesy of Margo Library.” Other pictures show some Cheyenne Warrior markers that can be found on the battlefield.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Where Noisy Walking Fell image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 23, 2015
4. Where Noisy Walking Fell
Cheyenne Warrior Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 23, 2015
5. Cheyenne Warrior Markers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 8, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 243 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 8, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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