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Smyrna in Cobb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Second Shoupade

 
 
Second Shoupade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
1. Second Shoupade Marker
click photo to see details of map etc.
Inscription.
Again, you are standing behind a Shoupade. This fort faced slightly west of north. It was one of five Shoupades along Fort Drive, which derived its name from the existence of these forts.

For over five decades (1950s to early 2000s), this Shoupade (#4 on map) was in the side yard of a house that was about 25 yards to the right (east), and the earthen mound was regularly moved.

At about this point in the River Line was the seam or junction of two Confederate divisions. We're not certain which division provided the troops that occupied this Shoupade, but Cleburne's Division was on the line from here to the left (west), and Bate's Division was on the line from here to the right (east). Both divisions were part of Hardee's Corps.

Major General Patrick R. Cleburne was born in Ireland in 1828. In his early 20's, he served as an enlisted soldier in the British Army. He immigrated to the U.S. and by 1850 settled in Helena, Arkansas where he was first a druggist, then a lawyer. He enlisted in the Confederate army as a private but was soon elected captain and proved extremely capable as an officer. By the summer of 1864, he was considered on of the best — if not the best — division commander in the Confederacy. Cleburne quickly recognized the value of the River Line's unique system of fortifications.
Second Shoupade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
2. Second Shoupade Marker
He was killed on 30 November 1864 at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee.

Major General William B. Bate was born in Tennessee in 1826 and was also a lawyer before the war, though he had been a volunteer soldier during the Mexican War. While he had performed competently in several battles, he had mismanaged an assault at Dallas (Paulding County), Georgia on 28 May 1864. Bate was wounded in the leg on 10 August 1864 near Utoy Creek (southwest of Atlanta). After the war, he served as governor of Tennessee (1883-1887) and as a U.S. Senator from 1887 until he died in office in 1905.

While not part of Shoupade Park, another Shoupade—the best preserved of all—is about 150 yards to the east, near the right-of-way fence for I-285. (#7 on map)
 
Location. 33° 50.219′ N, 84° 29.443′ W. Marker is in Smyrna, Georgia, in Cobb County. Marker can be reached from Oakdale Road south of Fort Drive, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Continue from the Artillery Redan Marker along the Shoupade Park Trail to reach the Second Shoupade Marker. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4770 Oakdale Road, Smyrna GA 30080, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Artillery Redan (within shouting distance of this marker); First Shoupade
Second Shoupade image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
3. Second Shoupade
(see yellow line following shape of Second Shoupade)
(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Shoupade Park (about 500 feet away); Collins Springs Primitive Baptist Church (approx. half a mile away); Here Johnstonís River Line Crossed the Rd. (approx. 1.2 miles away); Whittier Cotton Mill and Village (approx. 1.9 miles away); The Alexander Eaton House: Hoodís H'dq'rs. (approx. 1.9 miles away); United Distributors (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Smyrna.
 
Also see . . .  Shoupade Park. The River Line Historic Area (Submitted on August 11, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Patrick Ronayne Cleburne image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
4. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne
William B. Bate image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
5. William B. Bate
Second Shoupade image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
6. Second Shoupade
Second Shoupade image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
7. Second Shoupade
Disturbance of Second Shoupade by modern resident fireplace etc.
Second Shoupade image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
8. Second Shoupade
Sadly, residential development seen all around
Second Shoupade image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 7, 2008
9. Second Shoupade
Second Shoupade butting against modern residential yard
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 10, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 178 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on August 10, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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