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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

James Marion Sims

1813 - 1888

 

—Father of Modern Gynecology —

 
James Marion Sims Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 8, 2011
1. James Marion Sims Marker
Inscription.
Montgomery 1848-1849 Operations he devised cured a then considered hopeless malady—gaining him fame as a benefactor of women.

Founded—Women's Hospital—City of New York—-1855. Decorated by Emperor of France—Kings of Belgium, Spain, Portugal and Italy.
 
Erected 1939 by Medical Association of the State of Alabama.
 
Location. 32° 22.645′ N, 86° 18.055′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of South Bainbridge Street and Dexter Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located on the grounds of the Alabama State Capitol. Marker is at or near this postal address: South Bainbridge Street, Montgomery AL 36131, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Allan Wyeth (a few steps from this marker); Black Members of the Alabama Legislature Who Served During The Reconstruction Period of 1868-1879 (a few steps from this marker); United States Flag Raised Over Alabama Capitol (within shouting distance of this marker); Jefferson Davis (within shouting distance of this marker);
James Marion Sims Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 8, 2011
2. James Marion Sims Marker
Selma-to-Montgomery March (within shouting distance of this marker); Alabama State Capitol (within shouting distance of this marker); To the Memory of General Marquis De La Fayette (within shouting distance of this marker); Thousands Protest at the Seat of Government (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on J. Marion Sims. (Submitted on February 27, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Similar statue in New York City moved to cemetery.
A similar statue of the controversial Dr. J. Marion Sims, formerly located for years in New York's Central Park, has been moved to his grave site in Brooklyn. A New York City committee made the decision to move the statue in February of 2018 after many years of requests to do so.

In Dr. Sim's quest for an effective treatment for vesicovaginal fistula, a serious vaginal complication that causes great pain, resorted to using enslaved black women for his experiments.

It is alleged that Dr Sims performed surgeries on his subjects without anesthesia. He argued that the operations were not painful enough to warrant any form of anesthesia. Sims further reasoned that “black people did not feel as much pain as white people”, and therefore didn‘t require anesthesia during surgery. Many women died at the hands of the man who some people now regard as “the father of modern gynecology”.
    — Submitted February 27, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

 
Categories. Science & Medicine
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 27, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 15, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 279 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 15, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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