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Vierstraat, West Flanders, Belgium
 

Kemmel American Monument

27th and 30th U.S. Divisions in the Ypers-Lys Offensive

 
 
Kemmel American Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 26, 2015
1. Kemmel American Monument Marker
Inscription. This monument commemorates the achievements of the 27th and 30th Divisions which fought in the Ypres-Lys offensive with the British Army from 18 August to 4 September 1918. It was designed by the architect George Howe of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, an erected by the American Battle Monuments Commission in 1929.

The 27th and 30th Divisions served with the British Army from the time of their arrival in Europe in May 1918 until the Armistice. After being trained at the front during the summer of 1918, the 30th Division took command of its sector here on August 18th, and the 27th Division on August 23rd.

On August 30th, the Germans started a general withdrawal from the Lys salient to shorten their front line. By August 31st, the Germans had retired from Mount Kemmel. The 27th Division moved forward through the town of Vierstraat that day, while the 30th Division remained in place due to heavy enemy resistance. On September 1st, both Divisions attacked and achieved their objectives. On September 2nd, the 27th Division was able to put its units forward until they had contact with the new German line along its entire length. The 30th Division repulsed an attack in the area of Lankhof farm. The 27th Division was relieved on September 3rd, and the 30th Division on September 4th. They reentered the line about 3 weeks later
Kemmel American Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 26, 2015
2. Kemmel American Monument
27th Division 30th Division
Erected by the United States of America to commemorate the services of American troops who fought in this vicinity August 18 - September 4, 1918
in the battle for the Hindenburg Line. The casualties of the 27th Division totaled almost 1,300 officers and men, while those of the 30th were about 800. Many are buried in the Flanders Field American Cemetery, which is situated in the vicinity of Waregem, approximately 60 kms from this spot. Flanders Field is the only permanent American World War I cemetery in Belgium, and contains the remains of 368 American soldiers who fought and died for the liberation of Belgium. The cemetery is open every day of the year. This site is maintained by the American Battle Monuments Commission, and agency of the United States Government.

(French and Dutch transcriptions not provided, please click on the marker photo to enlarge.)
 
Erected 1929 by American Battle Monuments Commission.
 
Location. 50° 47.859′ N, 2° 50.949′ E. Marker is in Vierstraat, West Flanders. Marker is on Kemmelstraat (Route N331) 0.3 kilometers west of Vierstraat. Touch for map.
 
Also see . . .
1. Hundred Days Offensive. (Submitted on August 18, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee.)
2. American Battle Monuments Commission - Kemmel American Monument. (Submitted on August 18, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. War, World I
 
Close up of Area of Operations Map image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 26, 2015
3. Close up of Area of Operations Map
Kemmel American Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 26, 2015
4. Kemmel American Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 297 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 18, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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