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Story in Sheridan County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

The Wagon Box Fight: Continuing Controversies

 
 
The Wagon Box Fight: Continuing Controversies Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
1. The Wagon Box Fight: Continuing Controversies Marker
Inscription.
Over the years a controversy has arisen about the exact location of the Wagon Box Corral, Indian casualties and the length of the battle. The most disputed fact is the location of the corral. In the early 1900ís area residents brought survivors of the fight, both Indian and white, to the area in hopes of pinpointing the exact location of the corral. Unfortunately, the survivors were not at the site at the same time and did not agree on the location. One site chosen is the location laid out near where you are standing. The other location is a brass marker several hundred yards to the southeast. There has been much study in an attempt to resolve this debate, including correspondence with early residents, aerial photography, and archaeological surveys. The strongest evidence comes from archaeology done over several years, which indicates that the laid out corral may be close to correct. But if the actual participants could not agree on a location, then the best and most accurate description of the location of the corral is to say that it was placed somewhere atop the plateau, between Big and Little Piney Creeks. As to the other controversies, Indian casualties can probably be estimated at between six and sixty and the time of the fight from 8:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. As with all historical events research will continue and new facts will
The Wagon Box Fight: Continuing Controversies Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
2. The Wagon Box Fight: Continuing Controversies Marker
come to the surface.
 
Location. 44° 33.519′ N, 106° 53.903′ W. Marker is in Story, Wyoming, in Sheridan County. Marker can be reached from Wagon Box Road. Touch for map. Marker is located on a walking trail at the Wagon Box Fight Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Story WY 82842, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Red Cloudís Victory (a few steps from this marker); The Aftermath: Two Versions of Victory (a few steps from this marker); Valor in Attack (a few steps from this marker); To Save the Powder River Country (a few steps from this marker); Wood Cutting: A Hazardous Harvest (a few steps from this marker); Wagon Box Fight (a few steps from this marker); Wagon Box Monument (a few steps from this marker); A Fight to Survive (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Story.
 
More about this marker. A plot of artifacts in the Wagon Box Fight area appears at the lower right of the marker. The locations of the Wagon Box Corral area, the Wishart Corral, and artifacts such as cartridges and arrowheads are indicated.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. See all of the markers found on the Wagon Box Fight walking
Marker at the Wagon Box Fight Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
3. Marker at the Wagon Box Fight Historic Site
trail.
 
Also see . . .  The Wagon Box Fight, 1867. Account of the battle from the Wyoming State Historical Society. (Submitted on August 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Probable Site of the Wagon Box Corral image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, Account of
4. Probable Site of the Wagon Box Corral
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 223 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 19, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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