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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Strasburg in Arapahoe County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

First Transcontinental Railroad

 
 
Transcontinental Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 21, 2015
1. Transcontinental Railroad Marker
Inscription. A continuous chain of rails, from the Atlantic to the Pacific had long been a vision of pioneer railroaders and frontier tamers. It became a reality at 3:00 pm on August 15, 1870 at a point 928 feet east of railroad milepost 602, near Comanche Crossing. Named for a usually dry but sometimes rampaging creek, Comanche Crossing is about 3/4 of a mile east of present day Strasburg, Colorado. The last rails were spiked by Kansas Pacific Railroad crews driving west from Kansas and East from Denver to give the nation its first truly continuous coast-to-coast rail road. On the final day, the crews laid a record breaking 10 1/4 miles of track in 9 hours, to win a barrel of whiskey which canny foremen had placed midway in the final gap.

Entered in the National Register of Historic Places 8/10/70
Erected by Comanche Crossing Historical Society 2008
 
Erected 2008 by Comanche Crossing Historical Society.
 
Location. 39° 44.23′ N, 104° 19.883′ W. Marker is in Strasburg, Colorado, in Arapahoe County. Marker can be reached from East Colfax Avenue west of Wagner Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 56060 East Colfax Avenue, Strasburg CO 80136, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least
First Transcontinental Railroad Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 21, 2015
2. First Transcontinental Railroad Marker - Wide View
The marker is easily found on the grounds of the Comanche Crossing Historical Society Museum.
3 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Comanche Crossing Centennial (approx. 0.3 miles away); High-Five Plains Towns / Ten Miles a Day (approx. 3.5 miles away); Front Range Flight (approx. 3.5 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Comanche Crossing Historical Society & Museum. ...On August 15, 1870, the last 10 miles of track were laid by two crews, one working from the east and one from the west in a record-breaking nine hours. Fifteen months earlier, the golden spike ceremony had been held in Utah, to note the joining by rail of the eastern United States with the west. But the tracks joined at Promontory Summit connected only Omaha and Sacramento in a continuous chain. With the completion of the rails at Strasburg it became possible, at last, to board a train in New York and travel all the way to San Francisco by rail. (Submitted on August 23, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2015, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 488 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 23, 2015, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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