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Banner in Sheridan County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

The Band:

For Conflict or Conflict

 
 
The Band: Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
1. The Band: Marker
Inscription.
The 18th Infantry’s 40-piece Regimental Band was housed at Fort Phil Kearny in a 24 by 64 green log, panel constructed, dirt roofed barrack. The band provided drummers and buglers for drill, ceremony, and combat commands during the day. In the evening they would gather at an octagonal bandstand surrounding the flagstaff to serenade the post with martial or popular music of the day. On special occasions they would orchestrate waltzes at post dances. Their duties were truly ones of extremes; besides sounding commands or music to march by, members might also be called on to act as messengers, medical orderlies, or combat soldiers. Band members at the fort also built Colonel Carrington’s house, in addition to serving as clerks or supply personnel.

There is more historical information on the band at Fort Phil Kearny than some of the other units. It is known that the band members carried Spencer Carbines even though the men seldom went into combat as a complete unit. Following the December 6, 1866 skirmish, Colonel Carrington transferred these weapons to the cavalry, hoping to increase their fire power. All these weapons were lost in the Fetterman Fight two weeks later. Sadly, it is also known that the first death at Fort Phil Kearny was Bandmaster, Master Sergeant William Curry, who died of typhoid and pneumonia, leaving behind
The Band Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
2. The Band Marker
a wife and two boys.

“As we passed the Fort some distance we came to a halt for nearly an hour and a half . . . crossing the stream and ascending the bluffs beyond. As we lay there the brass band at the Fort commenced playing. Such sounds in such a scene! There was something in the wild, sweet strains that filled and floated through the deep reechoing valley that spoke of home; yet so far distant and in so wild a place that it partook of the nature of the scenes around it. It was like looking through the ‘glass of time’ into the dim Past . . . ”
From the diary of Davis Willson, August 7, 1866, near Fort Phil Kearny

 
Location. 44° 31.976′ N, 106° 49.544′ W. Marker is in Banner, Wyoming, in Sheridan County. Marker can be reached from Wagon Box Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located inside Fort Phil Kearny. Marker is in this post office area: Banner WY 82832, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Sutler’s Store: (within shouting distance of this marker); The Post Headquarters: (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Fort Phil Kearny (within shouting distance of this marker); The Guard House:
Marker in Fort Phil Kearny image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 24, 2015
3. Marker in Fort Phil Kearny
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Civilians: (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Bozeman Trail (about 400 feet away); Cemetery Site (about 400 feet away); Pilot Hill (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Banner.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker contains a photograph of a Regimental Band of the Civil War Period. The right side features a map showing the location of the Band Barracks.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Phil Kearny State Historic Site. (Submitted on August 25, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 24, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 140 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 24, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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