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New Windsor in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“The Publick Building Called the Temple”

 
 
"The Publick Building Called the Temple" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
1. "The Publick Building Called the Temple" Marker
Inscription. Chaplain Israel Evans proposed building a “Temple of Virtue” where officers could assemble for meetings and the army could worship together rather than attend separate services around town or ignore the Sabbath completely. To this end, soldiers provided 5,000 feet of finished timbers, 21,000 shingles, and sufficient fieldstone for construction of the cantonment’s largest building.

On March 15, 1783, in an emotional address to his officers not to rebel against the civil authority of the Congress over pay issues. Major Samuel Shaw wrote that Washington “took out his spectacles, and begged the indulgence of his audience while he put them on, observing at the same time, that he had grown gray in their service, and now found himself growing blind.” It was a subtle yet powerful way of reminding his loyal officers that even he had sacrificed much in the service of his country. On April 19, the “Cessation of Hostilities” was announced here formally ending combat.

to Day We Meet at the temple Whare there is a temples pulpit Maid and a Gallery for the Musick – it is a Bulding Which is Converted to Many Uses Which Makes Me think of Sinagoge of Old that We Read of.
Private Thomas Foster, 7th Massachusetts Regiment.

handsomely finished, with a spacious hall…the
Marker at New Windsor Cantonment image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
2. Marker at New Windsor Cantonment
vault of the hall was arched; at each end of the hall were two rooms, conveniently situated for the issuing of general orders, for the sitting of Boards of Officers, Courts Martial, &c.

General William Heath, describing the Temple Building.

 
Erected by State of New York.
 
Location. 41° 28.354′ N, 74° 3.569′ W. Marker is in New Windsor, New York, in Orange County. Marker can be reached from Temple Hill Road (New York State Route 300), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located at the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: New Windsor NY 12553, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Temple (a few steps from this marker); The People of the New Windsor Cantonment (within shouting distance of this marker); Unknown Soldier (within shouting distance of this marker); Revolutionary Hut (within shouting distance of this marker); New Windsor Cantonment (within shouting distance of this marker); The Land (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Temple Hill (about 300 feet away); Purple Heart Memorial (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Windsor.
 
More about this marker.
The Temple of Virtue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
3. The Temple of Virtue
This Temple Building is a reproduction of the original Temple of Virtue, built by soldiers for use as a chapel. It was here that Washington addressed his officers in 1783 to defuse a possible mutiny.
The bottom right of the marker features a photograph of the Temple Monument, with the caption “Following centennial celebrations in 1883, the Temple Hill Monument was constructed in 1891 near the site of the Temple. In the early 1960s, the National Temple Hill Association built a replica of the Temple on the site of the original based on information available at that time.
The top of the marker contains a drawing of the Temple of Virtue. It has a caption of “Private William Tarbell of the 7th Massachusetts Regiment drew the only known view of the ‘Temple of Virtue’ and the cantonment’s other buildings in 1783. On September 2, 1783, the cantonment’s empty buildings were sold at auction. James Latta purchased the Temple Building for fifteen pounds, eight shillings.
Also on the marker is a picture of Brigade Chaplain Israel Evans.
 
Also see . . .  New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site. New York State. (Submitted on July 3, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable BuildingsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Temple Hill Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
4. Temple Hill Monument
The monument was built in 1891 on what was thought to be the original location of the Temple of Virtue. Archeological findings later revealed it to be located slightly north of the monument's location, where the reconstructed temple now stands.
Entrance of The Temple image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
5. Entrance of The Temple
Interior of The Temple image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
6. Interior of The Temple
This was the largest building in the cantonment. In addition to providing a place for religious services, the building was also used for court-martial hearings, commissary and quartermaster activities and officers’ functions.
Interior of The Temple image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
7. Interior of The Temple
Gen. George Washington addressed his troops in this building on several occasions. On March 15, 1783, he confronted soldiers who were threatening to mutiny over not getting paid in what became know as his "Newburgh Addresses." He also announced the formal end of the War from this Temple.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 3, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 917 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 3, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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