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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near East Bernstadt in Laurel County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Hazel Patch

 
 
Hazel Patch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 6, 2015
1. Hazel Patch Marker
Inscription. Site of Wood’s Blockhouse 1793, one of the earliest permanent buildings in the wilderness. In May 1775, John Floyd and company, including Benjamin Logan, reached here and decided to use Skagg’s Trace. They proceeded westward, camping at the site called St. Asaph. Logan Station was built there (present-day Stanford) in 1777.
 
Erected 1950 by Kentucky Historical Society and Kentucky Department of Highways. (Marker Number 53.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kentucky Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 37° 13.794′ N, 84° 6.132′ W. Marker is near East Bernstadt, Kentucky, in Laurel County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 490 and Patton Road, on the left when traveling north on State Highway 490. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: East Bernstadt KY 40729, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Daniel Boone's Trail (approx. ¾ mile away); Pittsburg and Wilderness Road (approx. 4.7 miles away); Camp Wildcat (approx. 5.3 miles away); Camp Wildcat and the Wilderness Road (approx. 5.4 miles away); Camp Wildcat / Union Civil War Camp
Hazel Patch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 6, 2015
2. Hazel Patch Marker
(approx. 5.4 miles away); a different marker also named Camp Wildcat and the Wilderness Road (approx. 5.7 miles away); Hoosier Knob (approx. 5.9 miles away); Battle of Camp Wildcat (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in East Bernstadt.
 
Also see . . .  Friends of Boone Trace - Keepers of "That Little Road". (Submitted on August 24, 2015.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Fork in the Road
According to the Friends of Boone Trace, this area marks the “fork in the road” where in 1775 Daniel Boone and company proceeded north and John Floyd and Benjamin Logan proceeded northwest following Hazel Patch Creek. The Boone route eventually led to Boonesborough and became known as Boone Trace. The Floyd/Logan route, later known as Skagg’s Trace, led further northwest, eventually reaching as far as the Falls of the Ohio; this route was later designed as a wagon road that became the Wilderness Road in 1796.
    — Submitted August 24, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.

 
Categories. Colonial EraExplorationRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
View to North from Highway 490 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 6, 2015
3. View to North from Highway 490
Marker is near southwest corner of
intersection of Highway 490 and Patton Road
View to South from Highway 490 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 6, 2015
4. View to South from Highway 490
Marker is on right (west) side of highway
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 24, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 160 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 24, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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