Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Binarville in Marne Département, Champagne-Ardenne, France
 

Lost Battalion

2-7 October 1918

 
 
Lost Battalion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 25, 2015
1. Lost Battalion Marker
Inscription.
Co. A,B,C,E,G,& H
308th Inf. Regt.

Company K
307th Inf Regt.

Companies C & D
306th Machine Gun Bn.

77th Division

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 49° 15.093′ N, 4° 54.903′ E. Marker is in Binarville, Champagne-Ardenne, in Marne Département. Marker is on Route D66 just east of D62, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Binarville, Champagne-Ardenne 51800, France.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 16 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pennsylvania Memorial at Varennes en Argonne (approx. 8.9 kilometers away in Lorraine); Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery (approx. 15.9 kilometers away in Meuse).
 
More about this marker. The Marker is along the D66 road about two miles east of Binarville. The battle area is below the road from the marker and eastward approximately 200 yards. Access below the marker is very steep and difficult but the experience is worth it since there are clear battle scars and occasional war debris. The writer doesn't know who actually owns the property.
 
Also see . . .
Lost Battalion Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 25, 2015
2. Lost Battalion Battlefield

1. Wikipedia - Lost Battalion. (Submitted on August 26, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee.)
2. Monument unveils legend of 'Lost Battalion'. The US Army's article on the dedication of a monument to the Lost Battalion. Unfortunately, it is unclear whether the article refers to this monument. However, the article does provide a summary of the battle and its importance. (Submitted on August 26, 2015.) 
 
Categories. War, World I
 
LTC Charles W. Whittlesey-Medal of Honor Recipient-Argonne Forest image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 13, 2007
3. LTC Charles W. Whittlesey-Medal of Honor Recipient-Argonne Forest
He is buried at Sea in the Ocean off Cuba, however he has a "In Memory Of" marker in Pittsfield Cemetery, Pittsville MA. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: WHITTLESEY, CHARLES W. • Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Army, 308th Infantry, 77th Division • Place and date: Northeast of Binarville, in the forest of Argonne France, 2-7 October 1918 • Entered service at: Pittsfield, Mass. • G.O. No.: 118, W.D., 1918 Citation: Although cut off for 5 days from the remainder of his division, Maj. Whittlesey maintained his position, which he had reached under orders received for an advance, and held his command, consisting originally of 46 officers and men of the 308th Infantry and of Company K of the 307th Infantry, together in the face of superior numbers of the enemy during the 5 days. Maj. Whittlesey and his command were thus cut off, and no rations or other supplies reached him, in spite of determined efforts which were made by his division. On the 4th day Maj. Whittlesey received from the enemy a written proposition to surrender, which he treated with contempt, although he was at the time out of rations and had suffered a loss of about 50 percent in killed and wounded of his command and was surrounded by the enemy.
Major George G. McMurtry-Medal of Honor Recipient-Argonne Forest image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 24, 2003
4. Major George G. McMurtry-Medal of Honor Recipient-Argonne Forest
He is buried in Ledge Lawn Cemetery, Bar Harbor, ME. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: McMURTRY, GEORGE G. • Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Army, 308th Infantry, 77th Division • Place and date: At Charlevaux, in the forest of Argonne, France, 2-8 October 1918 • Entered service at: New York, N.Y. • G.O. No.: 118, W.D., 1918 Citation: Commanded a battalion which was cut off and surrounded by the enemy and although wounded in the knee by shrapnel on 4 October and suffering great pain, he continued throughout the entire period to encourage his officers and men with a resistless optimism that contributed largely toward preventing panic and disorder among the troops, who were without food, cut off from communication with our lines. On 4 October during a heavy barrage, he personally directed and supervised the moving of the wounded to shelter before himself seeking shelter. On 6 October he was again wounded in the shoulder by a German grenade, but continued personally to organize and direct the defense against the German attack on the position until the attack was defeated. He continued to direct and command his troops, refusing relief, and personally led his men out of the position after assistance arrived before permitting himself to be taken to the hospital on 8 October. During this period the successful defense of the position was due largely to his efforts
Lost Battalion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steven M Gutierrez, circa March 21, 2016
5. Lost Battalion Marker
Private Cecil Cervantes Miranda
Lost Battalion Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 25, 2015
6. Lost Battalion Battlefield
Lost Battalion Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 25, 2015
7. Lost Battalion Battlefield
Lost Battalion Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, June 25, 2015
8. Lost Battalion Battlefield
The Pocket image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Signal Corps, circa 1918
9. The Pocket
Lost Battalion Map image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of BattleDetectives.com
10. Lost Battalion Map
Lost Battalion Survivors image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Signal Corps
11. Lost Battalion Survivors
The Lost Battalion suffered extremely high casualties. Only 194 Soldiers (out of 697) were able to walk out of the ravine on the afternoon of Oct. 8. The rest of the Lost Battalion was dead, wounded or sick, missing or taken as prisoners of war. Whittlesey and the only two other officers who walked out that day each were awarded the Medal of Honor for holding the command together under incredibly difficult circumstances. - www.army.mil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 26, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 554 times since then and 145 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 26, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee.   3, 4. submitted on January 11, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   5. submitted on April 12, 2016, by Steven M Gutierrez of Arvin, California.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on August 26, 2015, by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement