Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Invaded Farmland

 

—First Battle of Manassas —

 
Invaded Farmland Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
1. Invaded Farmland Marker
Inscription. The morning of the battle was hot and still. Except for a few details the scene mirrored today's pastoral landscape. Fields lay fallow, overgrown with tall grass. Around the Henry House grew rose bushes and a small peach orchard. Eighty-five-year-old Judith Henry was inside, bedridden, too old to work the farm that had been in her family for more than a century.

At ten o’clock Confederate cannon suddenly rumbled into position on the rise 100 yards ahead. There artillerists turned their guns towards Matthews Hill.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 48.89′ N, 77° 31.368′ W. Marker was near Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker could be reached from Sudley Road (Virginia Route 234) 0.4 miles south of Lee Highway (U.S. 29), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. The marker on the Henry House Hill trail, which starts at the Manassas National Battlefield Park visitor center. Marker was in this post office area: Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this location
Invaded Farmland and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
2. Invaded Farmland and Marker
. A different marker also named Invaded Farmland (here, next to this marker); Honoring the Dead (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Honoring the Dead (was a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing. ); The Grave of Our Dear Mother, Judith Henry (a few steps from this marker); Colonel Cameron (within shouting distance of this marker); Wade Hampton (within shouting distance of this marker); The Marines of '61 (within shouting distance of this marker); Lieutenant Ramsey (within shouting distance of this marker); 7th Georgia Markers (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Artillery Duel (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. In the upper right is a depiction of the Henry House during peacetime. In the lower center is a photo of Henry House as it appeared just after the battle, riddled with bullets and cannon-fire. Mrs. Henry had insisted on remaining in her house. That afternoon she was killed by an artillery shell meant for sharpshooters firing from her windows. (Judith Henry's
Henry House at the Invaded Farm, Rebuilt after the War image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
3. Henry House at the Invaded Farm, Rebuilt after the War
This marker is on the left. The "Honoring the Dead" marker is on the right.
grave and inscribed headstone are in the cemetery nearby.)

 
Regarding Invaded Farmland. This marker has been replaced by a new marker, also named "Invaded Farmland".
 
Also see . . .
1. Battlefield Map. (Submitted on March 3, 2007.)
2. Battle of Manassas, or Bull Run. Excerpt from General James Longstreet's memoirs From Manassas to Appomattox. (Submitted on March 3, 2007.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
This Was Once the Henry Farm, With a View of the Bull Run Mountains image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
4. This Was Once the Henry Farm, With a View of the Bull Run Mountains
Detail on the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
5. Detail on the Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 3, 2007, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,960 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 3, 2007, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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