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Near Worden in Klamath County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Resolving the Oregon Question

 
 
Resolving the Oregon Question Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 21, 2015
1. Resolving the Oregon Question Marker
Inscription. Four years after the end of the War of 1812, Great Britain and the United States agreed their citizens could trade in Oregon country without prejudice to either nation's claim. Both countries strived for that extra influence which could blossom into sovereignty. The "Oregon Question" became an issue of greater concern, accelerating to a salient dispute by the early 1840s. Polk's 1844 residential campaign was based entirely on the quotation printed to the right. Polk was not a volatile statesman: the activist Northwestern U.S. Senator, Lewis Cass, coined the slogan "All Oregon or none, 54-40 or fight." the United States and Imperial Russia agreed in 1823 to limit their spheres of influence to fifty-four degrees, forty minutes north latitude - today's boundary between Alaska and Canada. War between Great Britain and the United States was avoided on June 15, 1846 with the completion of the Convention of Washington which resolved the Oregon Question by establishing the 49th parallel as the international boundary.
There are four great measures... which are to be measures of my administration: one, a reduction of the tariff; another, the independent treasury; a third, the settlement of the Oregon boundary question; and, lastly, the acquisition of California. - James K. Polk, 11th President of the United States.
 
Location.
Resolving the Oregon Question Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 21, 2015
2. Resolving the Oregon Question Marker
This marker is to the right of the large wooden panel.
42° 0.201′ N, 121° 53.393′ W. Marker is near Worden, Oregon, in Klamath County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 97, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 24800 U.S. Highway 97, Klamath Falls OR 97601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The 42nd Parallel (a few steps from this marker); Western International History (a few steps from this marker); Applegate Trail (a few steps from this marker); Dorris Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.1 miles away in California); Picard California (approx. 5.1 miles away in California); Bear Valley (approx. 8.6 miles away); Whittle's Ferry Site (approx. 8.8 miles away); Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge (approx. 9.2 miles away in California). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Worden.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located at the Francis C. Landrum Historic Wayside.
 
Also see . . .
1. Oregon boundary dispute - Wikipedia. Expansionist competition into the region began in the 18th century, with participants including the Russian Empire, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the Kingdom of Spain and the United States of America. By the 1820s, both the Russians, through the Russo-American Treaty of 1824 and the Russo-British Treaty of 1825 and the Spanish, by the Adams Onis Treaty of 1819, formally withdrew their territorial pretensions and efforts at establishing colonies in the region. Through these treaties the British and Americans gained residual territorial claims in the disputed area. (Submitted on August 31, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Oregon Border Dispute 1846 - Road to Confederation. An earlier treaty had established the border between Canada and the United States at the 49th parallel, but only to the Rocky Mountains. West of the Rockies was undefined and jointly occupied by British and Americans. During the mid-1800s, however, the Pacific region border came under dispute. More Americans were settling in the area, known as Oregon Country. (Submitted on August 31, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 31, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 178 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 31, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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