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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Windsor in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The People of the New Windsor Cantonment

 
 
The People of the New Windsor Cantonment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
1. The People of the New Windsor Cantonment Marker
Inscription. Approximately 7,500 soldiers of the Continental Army, who came from New England, the Mid-Atlantic states, Canada, and even Europe, lived at New Windsor Cantonment. Although most were in their twenties, the soldiers ranged in age from their early teens to their sixties. Some had served since the first shots of the Revolutionary War were fired in 1775. Officers and enlisted men lived in log huts here. Major generals and hospital staff, however, were billeted in private homes nearby in New Windsor and Newburgh.

Some 500 women and children also lived here. They were the wives and families of soldiers, largely desperate refugees from their war-torn communities. Here, they tried to earn livings as washerwomen, seamstresses, and nurses. Many traveled hundreds of miles on foot with only the possessions they could carry.

We are busily employed completing our Town. It will I suppose contain of Honest men – women – and the progeny of both, ten thousand souls.
Lieutenant Colonel Tech Tilghman, General Washington’s Staff
 
Erected by State of New York.
 
Location. 41° 28.338′ N, 74° 3.566′ W. Marker is in New Windsor, New York, in Orange County. Marker can be reached
Marker at New Windsor Cantonment image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
2. Marker at New Windsor Cantonment
The marker can be seen in this photo next to the Temple Hill Monument. The Temple of Virtue is also visible in the background.
from Temple Hill Road (New York State Route 300), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located at the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: New Windsor NY 12553, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Temple (a few steps from this marker); Unknown Soldier (within shouting distance of this marker); "The Publick Building Called the Temple" (within shouting distance of this marker); Revolutionary Hut (within shouting distance of this marker); New Windsor Cantonment (within shouting distance of this marker); Temple Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Purple Heart Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Land (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Windsor.
 
More about this marker. A drawing of several soldiers appears on the upper right of the marker. It has a caption of “These crude sketches by a French officer, Jean-Baptiste Antoine de Verger, illustrate the range of men who served in Washington’s army.

In addition, there are several photographs of reenactors at the New Windsor Cantonment representing the various residents of this site during the Continental Army’s stay here. A photo of a blacksmith at work has the caption “Blacksmiths, carpenters, masons,
Sketch from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
3. Sketch from Marker
This sketch from the marker, made by French officer Jean-Baptiste Antoine de Verger, shows the various soldiers who were part of the New Windsor Cantonment.
and lime burners were among the skilled army tradesmen known as artificers.” A photo of a woman in camp is on the marker above the caption “Soldier’s wives took on essential duties in an 18th-century camp, such as cooking, washing laundry, sewing and hospital work. After the war, they were entitled to apply for pensions.” A photo of two soldiers, one tending to a garden, has the caption “In addition to military exercises, guard duty, and building huts and roads, soldiers planted gardens to provide fresh produce after enduring a winter of dried peas.” A final photo of two woman cooking contains the caption “At the cantonment’s ‘market days’ each Wednesday and Saturday, soldiers’ wives could purchase or barter for foods from local farmers to supplement their families’ army rations.”
 
Also see . . .  New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site. New York State. (Submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Soldier Hut image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
4. Soldier Hut
The Continental Soldiers at New Windsor stayed in huts such as this one found a short distance from the marker. This hut was removed from the cantonment after the war, but was returned about 150 years later.
Temple of Virtue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
5. Temple of Virtue
A reconstruction of the Temple of Virtue exists on the location of the original temple. From this building, General Washington announced the formal end of the Revolutionary War.
Blacksmith at New Windsor Cantonment image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
6. Blacksmith at New Windsor Cantonment
Blacksmiths, like this reenactor at Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site, were among the "People of the New Windsor Cantonment."
New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 7, 2008
7. New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site
The marker, as well as the rest of the above photos, are from the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,427 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 4, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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