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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Oak Grove Baptist Church

 
 
Oak Grove Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, September 7, 2015
1. Oak Grove Baptist Church Marker
Inscription. Named Oak Grove because of its original location in a grove of Oak trees, the history of the church began with a small group of "freed" blacks in 1863. Mary C. and Ella J. Williams of Williams plantation permitted the members to use a parcel of the plantation land to construct a Bush Arbor. Oak Grove became a member of the Friendship District Association through the efforts of its first pastor, Alexander Blue. The Williamses deeded 2.8 acres to the church on December 10, 1885. The present church building is the fifth constructed on the original site.
 
Erected 1988 by Oak Grove Baptist Church and the Shelby County Historical Society.
 
Location. 35° 12.229′ N, 89° 49.162′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker is at the intersection of Stage Road (U.S. 64) and Santa Valley Street on Stage Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7317 US-64, Memphis TN 38133, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Ann Catholic Church (approx. 1.5 miles away); Warren Chapel Pisgah Cemetery (approx. 1.8 miles away); Bartlett Veterans Memorial (approx.
Oak Grove Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Masler, September 7, 2015
2. Oak Grove Baptist Church Marker
2.8 miles away); The Geographical Center of Shelby County (approx. 2.8 miles away); Bartlett, Tennessee (approx. 2.8 miles away); Nicholas Gotten (approx. 2.9 miles away); Nashoba (approx. 3.5 miles away); Davies Manor (approx. 4 miles away).
 
Additional comments.
1. Freed Blacks and Oak Grove Baptist Church
The marker mentions that the church was founded by "freed" blacks. The quotation marks may refer to the fact that although the Emancipation Proclamation was issued on January 1, 1863, it only stated that all persons held as slaves within the rebellious states are, and henceforward shall be free. Tennessee had already fallen to the Union and therefore, technically, the slaves in Tennessee were not freed by the proclamation.
    — Submitted September 7, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee.

 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 108 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 7, 2015, by Steve Masler of Memphis, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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