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Fairfax Station in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fairfax Station

“The angel of the battlefield.”

 
 
Fairfax Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 10, 2007
1. Fairfax Station Marker
Inscription. The first Fairfax Station depot, built by Irish immigrants in 1852, was a stop on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from Alexandria to Gordonsville. Early in 1862, after Confederate forces withdrew, the railroad carried military supplies and letters and packages from home to Union soldiers camped north of the Occoquan River and at nearby Fairfax Court House.

In Sept. 1862, wounded Union soldiers were transported here after the Second Battle of Manassas for evacuation to Alexandria and Washington, D.C., hospitals. Clara Barton, whom an army surgeon called “the true heroine of the age, the angel of the battlefield,” and who founded the American Red Cross in 1881, nursed the soldiers here. She later wrote, “We were a little band of almost empty-handed workers, literally by ourselves, in the wild woods of Virginia, with 3000 suffering dying men crowded upon the few acres within our reach.”

Col. Herman Haupt, Chief of Construction and Transportation, ordered the depot burned after Barton and the last wounded soldiers were evacuated to Washington on Sept. 2, 1862. “Have fired it. Goodbye,” Mr. McCrickett, a railroad employee, telegraphed Haupt. The Federals rebuilt the station just two months later. New York, Vermont, Illinois, Pennsylvania, and Delaware regiments guarded
1903 Fairfax Station and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 10, 2007
2. 1903 Fairfax Station and Marker
The Southern Railroad station was moved away from the tracks to this site in the 1980s. It now houses the Fairfax Station Railroad Museum, open Sunday afternoons.
it against surprise attacks by Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and Col. John S. Mosby until the end of the war.

New buildings completed in 1873, 1891, and 1903 served a growing Fairfax Station community. In the 1980s, the 1903 station was moved to this site. It houses the Fairfax Station Railroad Museum, opened in 1988 to educate visitors about railroading, Civil War, and local history.
 
Erected 2003 by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 48.027′ N, 77° 19.888′ W. Marker is in Fairfax Station, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker is on Fairfax Station Road 0.4 miles west of Ox Road (Virginia Route 123), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. It is at the Fairfax Station Railroad Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Fairfax Station VA 22039, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Fairfax Station (here, next to this marker); Skirmish at St. Mary’s (approx. 0.3 miles away); St. Mary’s Catholic Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Clara H. Barton
Fairfax Station and Southern Caboose image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 10, 2007
3. Fairfax Station and Southern Caboose
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Fairfax Nike Missile Site (approx. 1.4 miles away); David R. Pinn Community Center (approx. 1.8 miles away); The Huldah Coffer House (approx. 2.1 miles away); Fairfax Rosenwald School (approx. 2.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fairfax Station.
 
Also see . . .
1. A Brief History of the Station. (Submitted on March 10, 2007.)
2. PDF of the marker. (Submitted on April 15, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.)
 
Categories. Notable PersonsRailroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 10, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,606 times since then and 122 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 10, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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