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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Yellowstone National Park in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Grizzly Fumarole

 
 
Grizzly Fumarole Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2015
1. Grizzly Fumarole Marker
Inscription.
Changing with the Seasons
All hydrothermal features change, but Grizzly Fumarole changes from day to day, and season to season, reflecting recent weather conditions.

What is Hydrothermal?
Hydro = Water       Thermal = Heat

During dry weather, steam rises from Grizzly Fumarole’s mostly dry vents

Rain or snow transforms the fumarole into mudpots. A single, large mudpot often appears in Spring.

Mudpot or Fumarole?
A fumarole or steam vent’s underground system is nearly dry. Heated deep below the surface, the water turns to steam, the rises with other gasses.

Mudpots are muddy springs. Microorganisms live in mudpots and convert hydrogen sulfide gas from Yellowstone’s magma chamber into sulfuric acid. This acid breaks rock and soil into mud.

< Sidebar: >
Yellowstone’s Hydrothermal Features
Rain and snow seep into the ground. Heated by Yellowstone’s magma chamber, the water rises to the surface as a geyser, hot spring, mudpot, or fumarole.
Underground water is heated by Yellowstone’s magma chamber. Extreme water pressure forces the super-heated water to rise.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 44° 37.391′ 
Grizzly Fumarole Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2015
2. Grizzly Fumarole Marker
N, 110° 26.138′ W. Marker is in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker can be reached from Grand Loop Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is on a walking trail in the Mud Volcano area. Marker is in this post office area: Yellowstone National Park WY 82190, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cooking Hillside (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dragon's Mouth Spring (about 700 feet away); Mud Volcano (about 700 feet away); Mud Geyser (about 700 feet away); Churning Caldron (approx. 0.2 miles away); Black Dragon’s Caldron (approx. 0.2 miles away); Volcanic Landscape (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sulphur Caldron (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Yellowstone National Park.
 
More about this marker. Photographs of Grizzly Fumarole during a dry spell and as a bubbling mudpot appear at the bottom left of the marker. The sidebar includes a diagram of thermal features like Mudpots, Hot Springs, Cone Geyser, Fountain Geyser, and Fumarole.
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Grizzly Fumarole Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2015
3. Grizzly Fumarole Marker
Grizzly Fumarole image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2015
4. Grizzly Fumarole
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 155 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 16, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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