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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

The March of Loyalty

La Marcha de la Lealtad

 
 
The March of Loyalty Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 9, 2013
1. The March of Loyalty Marker
Inscription.
México
Gobierno de la República
en Conmemoración del
Centenario
de la
Marcha de la Lealtad
en la que cadetes del
Heroico Colegio Militar
custodiaron al
Presidente Francisco I. Madero
rumbo a Palacio Nacional,
refrendando su
patriotismo y respeto a las instituciones.

Gobierno de la República
9 de febrero de 2013

English translation:
Mexico
Government of the Republic
In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the March of Loyalty, where cadets of the Heroic Military College accompanied President Francisco I. Madero to the National Palace, affirming their patriotism and respect for the nation’s institutions.
Government of the Republic
February 9, 2013

 
Erected 2013.
 
Location. 19° 25.213′ N, 99° 10.917′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México. Touch for map. In the Bosque de Chapultepec (Chapultepec Park), the marker is on the southern side of Chapultepec Castle, mounted to a column that forms an extended stone corridor.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Military College of Mexico (a few steps from this marker); Francisco Marquez, Child Hero of Mexico (a few steps from
The March of Loyalty Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 9, 2013
2. The March of Loyalty Marker
this marker); National Astronomical Observatory of Mexico (within shouting distance of this marker); From the Peak (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Sounds in the Distance (about 90 meters away); The Castle Garden (about 90 meters away); Vicente Suarez, Child Hero of Mexico (about 90 meters away); Juan Escutia, Child Hero of Mexico (about 150 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Regarding The March of Loyalty. Francisco Madero became the 33rd Mexican President by challenging the reign of President Porfirio Diaz in 1910. He attempted to promote social justice and democracy; however his time in office was contentious, as he upset the aristocracy without moving fast enough to satisfy the poor. On the morning of February 9, 1913 an uprising began in Mexico City in an attempt to overthrow him. General Manuel Mondragon, Felix Diaz and Bernardo Reyes, supported by the cadets of the Officer's Academy of Tlalpan and other troops, took over the National Palace. The Palace was then recovered by General Lauro
Madero entering the Plaza near the National Palace, Feb. 9, 1913. image. Click for full size.
September 2, 1913
3. Madero entering the Plaza near the National Palace, Feb. 9, 1913.
Note the cadets surrounding President Madero.
Villar. During the fight nearly a hundred civilians and soldiers, including General Bernardo Reyes, died. The rebels, despite having superior numbers, decided to withdraw to the “Ciudadela”, a nearby fort. President Madero was informed that the Palace had been recovered, so he decided to march to Constitution Square (the Zócalo) near the Palace. He met with the acting director of the Military College, Lieutenant Colonel Victor Hernandez Covarrubias, and encouraged the cadets to join him on the march. He gave a short speech to them, saying, “An uprising has occurred and the Officer’s Academy, driven by unworthy officers in uniform, has shattered the honor of the Army’s youth. This error can only be corrected by another part of the military’s youth, and so I come to put myself in the hands of the Military College, whose attachment to discipline and duty has never been denied. I invite you to join me in a column of honor to the gates of the Palace, assaulted this morning by the officer candidates and their officers and has since returned to government power, which has managed to reduce the order of the rebels.”
The president, on horseback, was guarded by three hundred cadets, dressed in full uniform. Once in the Palace, Madero held a meeting with his secretaries and they attempted to reach out to other branches of the military for support in quelling the
Sufragio efectivo - No reelección by Juan O´Gorman, 1969 image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 1, 2015
4. Sufragio efectivo - No reelección by Juan O´Gorman, 1969
(Effective voting - No reelection, Museo Nacional de Historia, Ciudad de México).
rebellion. However, military actions around the "Ciudadela" continued and nine days later the coup achieved its purpose in overthrowing and eventually assassinating President Madero, thanks to the betrayals perpetrated by Generals Huerta and Blanquet.
 
Additional keywords. Revolución Mexicana, Mexican Revolution
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWars, Non-US
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 335 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 16, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   4. submitted on January 5, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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