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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Menominee in Menominee County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Menominee / Main Street Historic District

 
 
Menominee Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, September 18, 2015
1. Menominee Marker
Inscription.
(Side 1:)
Menominee

French-Canadian voyager Louis Chaput (Chappee) came here during the late 1790s. Chaput, an agent for the American Fur Company, was the first white settler in Menominee, which was named for the Menominee Indians who inhabited this area. Within the next one hundred years Menominee developed into a prosperous city, built along the waterfront with money from the booming lumber industry. By 1890 twelve steam-powered lumber mills operated here. The fishing and paper industries and the production of pig iron contributed to a broadening economic base. By 1902 the population had reached thirty thousand. As the pine forests of the Upper Peninsula were depleted, the population declined. During the 1990s it stabilized at nine thousand.

(Side 2:)
Main Street Historic District

The Main Street Historic District comprises buildings dating from the prosperous era of lumbering and shipping that began around 1890 and continued until the timber supply was depleted in the early twentieth century. Local architects and others from Chicago, Minneapolis and Green Bay designed buildings constructed of native red sandstone and locally made brick. The general store of Ludington, Wells and Van Schalck Company, at 501 First Street, served employees of the second largest
Main Street Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, September 18, 2015
2. Main Street Historic District Marker
lumber company in the county. The Paalzow Building at 409 First Street was built in 1895 and displays the only example in the district of a cast iron facade. The Main Street Historic District is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Erected 1996 by Michigan Historical Center, Michigan Department of State. (Marker Number L1944.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Michigan Historical Commission marker series.
 
Location. 45° 6.396′ N, 87° 36.263′ W. Marker is in Menominee, Michigan, in Menominee County. Marker is at the intersection of 1st Street and 9th Avenue, on the right when traveling north on 1st Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Menominee MI 49858, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Spies Public Library (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Menominee Area (approx. mile away); Bay de Nocquet Trail (approx. 1.1 miles away); 10,000 Board Feet of Logs (approx. 1.3 miles away in Wisconsin); Menominee River (approx. 1.3 miles away in Wisconsin); Evancheck Cabin
Menominee / Main Street Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, September 18, 2015
3. Menominee / Main Street Historic District Marker
Looking east toward Green Bay
(approx. 1.3 miles away in Wisconsin); Isaac Stephenson (approx. 1.4 miles away in Wisconsin); Queen Marinette (approx. 1 miles away in Wisconsin). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Menominee.
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryIndustry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Main Street Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, September 18, 2015
4. Main Street Historic District Marker
409 1st Street mentioned on the marker
Main Street Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, September 18, 2015
5. Main Street Historic District Marker
501 1st Street mentioned on the marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 21, 2015, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 165 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 21, 2015, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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