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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Yellowstone National Park in Park County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Wolf Tracks

 
 
Wolf Tracks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
1. Wolf Tracks Marker
Inscription.
Gray wolves (Canis lupus) are the largest member of the canine family. They are well suited to Yellowstone where winters are long and severe. Wolves move easily over the snow on their large paws, their thick fur keeping them warm.

Wolves have bushy tails and short, rounded ears. They can run 43 miles per hour on their long legs! Howling is a form of communication that is often heard on a calm Yellowstone night. Pups are born in April or May. The entire pack helps take care of them.

Social Life
Most wolves are social animals that live in packs of five or more members. They hunt, eat, and rest together. The alpha pair, one male and one female, are the leaders of the pack.

Pups
Pups are born in spring in their den. While their parents are hunting, other pack members take turns “babysitting.” Like other mammals, young wolves learn important skills while playing with each other.

Hunting
Wolves’ long legs allow then to race across the landscape for great distances. Their speed, stamina, and “teamwork” are extremely beneficial while hunting.

In Yellowstone, wolves’ primary food is elk. Because they hunt cooperatively with other members of their pack, wolves are able to hunt large mammals such as elk, moose, or bison. They also eat small mammals,
Wolf Tracks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
2. Wolf Tracks Marker
birds, eggs, berries, and carrion.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 44° 57.607′ N, 110° 33.987′ W. Marker is in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, in Park County. Marker can be reached from Upper Grand Loop Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Forces of the Northern Range Trail, on the Grand Loop Road between Tower-Roosevelt and Mammoth Hot Springs. Marker is in this post office area: Yellowstone National Park WY 82190, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Forest that Needs Fire (within shouting distance of this marker); A Wildlife Paradise (within shouting distance of this marker); Fire – A Fundamental Force (within shouting distance of this marker); Trembling Aspens (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Forces of the Northern Range Self-Guiding Trail (about 300 feet away); Seasons of the Range (about 300 feet away); What’s Blooming? (about 400 feet away); The Land Tells the Story (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Yellowstone National Park.
 
More about this marker. The marker contains several pictures of wolves. Wolf track impressions are on the left side of the marker.
 
Categories. Animals
 
Marker on the Forces of the Northern Range Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
3. Marker on the Forces of the Northern Range Trail
Wolf Tracks from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
4. Wolf Tracks from Marker
Forces of the Northern Range Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 29, 2015
5. Forces of the Northern Range Trail
The Wolf Tracks marker is located on the Forces of the Northern Range Trail.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 136 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 23, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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