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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Riley in Geary County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

In Memory of Civil War Horses and Mules

 
 
Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 2, 2015
1. Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial
Inscription.

In memory
of the one and one half million
horses and mules of the Union and
Confederate armies who were killed
were wounded, or died from disease
in the Civil War

Reverse
Sculpture by Tessa Pullan 1996
Gift to the United States Military Museum
From Major Paul Mellon
Instructor of Horsemanship
The Cavalry School Fort Riley Kansas
April 1942 - February 1943

 
Erected 1996 by Major Paul Mellon.
 
Location. 39° 3.796′ N, 96° 46.91′ W. Marker is in Fort Riley, Kansas, in Geary County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Henry Avenue and Sheridan Avenue. Touch for map. Located behind the U.S. Cavalry Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 205 Henry Avenue, Fort Riley KS 66442, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ogden Monument (a few steps from this marker); M16 Multiple Gun Motor Carriage (a few steps from this marker); M5 Stuart Light Tank (a few steps from this marker); M24 Chaffee Light Tank (within shouting distance of this marker); M4A3 Sherman Medium Tank
Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 2, 2015
2. Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial
(within shouting distance of this marker); 16th Infantry Regiment — 1st Infantry Division (within shouting distance of this marker); M113 Armored Personnel Carrier (within shouting distance of this marker); M3A1 37 mm Anti-Tank Gun (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Riley.
 
Regarding In Memory of Civil War Horses and Mules. There were more horse and mule casualties during the war years than casualties of men. And as with the soldiers, more of the equines perished from disease or exhaustion than from being hit by bullets. Many died of glanders, which is a highly infectious disease that affects a horse’s nasal passages, respiration and skin. With that said, horses withstood enemy fire as it was hard to bring down a huge horse with a minie ball. Some have estimated that the average horse was wounded five times.
 
Categories. AnimalsMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial (Reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 2, 2015
3. Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial (Reverse)
Wide shot of Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 2, 2015
4. Wide shot of Civil War Horses and Mules Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 25, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 205 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 25, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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